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Meeting the Unique Dermatologic Needs of Black Patients

Meeting the Unique Dermatologic Needs of Black Patients Opinion EDITORIAL Susan C. Taylor, MD As a pioneer in the field of skin of color, I have been dismayed cal interactions. Cursory skin examination and avoidance of that black patients remain largely overlooked in dermatology physical contact by physicians outside of a Skin of Color Cen- education, research, and publications despite comprising 14.3% ter (SOCC) were viewed as signs of disrespect and raised con- cerns about racial sensitivity in 1 participant. Thus, culturally of the US population. Likewise, the number of blacks in the dermatology workforce re- sensitive, competent care is fundamental to a quality visit for mains abysmal, which has im- black patients. Culturally competent care is a patient- Related article page 1129 portant implications for pa- centered approach to care that includes establishing rapport tient care. These statements also apply to Latino patients and with the patient and engaging in shared decision-making in a other patients of color, including patients of other nonwhite manner that is respectful of a patient’s values, goals, health races and ethnicities. In this issue of JAMA Dermatology, needs, and cultural background. Improving cultural compe- Gorbatenko-Roth and colleagues address an important and tence and gaining understanding and appreciation of a pa- infrequently http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

Meeting the Unique Dermatologic Needs of Black Patients

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 155 (10) – Oct 21, 2019

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2019.1963
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Susan C. Taylor, MD As a pioneer in the field of skin of color, I have been dismayed cal interactions. Cursory skin examination and avoidance of that black patients remain largely overlooked in dermatology physical contact by physicians outside of a Skin of Color Cen- education, research, and publications despite comprising 14.3% ter (SOCC) were viewed as signs of disrespect and raised con- cerns about racial sensitivity in 1 participant. Thus, culturally of the US population. Likewise, the number of blacks in the dermatology workforce re- sensitive, competent care is fundamental to a quality visit for mains abysmal, which has im- black patients. Culturally competent care is a patient- Related article page 1129 portant implications for pa- centered approach to care that includes establishing rapport tient care. These statements also apply to Latino patients and with the patient and engaging in shared decision-making in a other patients of color, including patients of other nonwhite manner that is respectful of a patient’s values, goals, health races and ethnicities. In this issue of JAMA Dermatology, needs, and cultural background. Improving cultural compe- Gorbatenko-Roth and colleagues address an important and tence and gaining understanding and appreciation of a pa- infrequently

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 21, 2019

References