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Medicine's International Characteristics, Responsibilities, and Opportunities

Medicine's International Characteristics, Responsibilities, and Opportunities THIRTY-FOUR YEARS AGO, Dr. Arthur Dean Bevan, then chairman of the Council on Medical Education and Hospital of the American Medical Association, pointed out that medicine is one of the great functions of modern civilization. He said: Medicine is in everyday contact with every individual in every community. Without modern scientific medicine, without modern public health service, our modern civilization would soon cease to exist. Great cities, such as London, New York, Paris and Chicago, would be impossible. They would soon rot away under great plagues as the larger centers of population did in the Middle Ages. Medical education and medical practice are not functions of the university and the medical profession alone; they are functions of modern civilization in which the entire community is vitally interested. That statement, so true in 1928, has even greater application in the world today. Now, the "entire community" is literally the whole world. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Medicine's International Characteristics, Responsibilities, and Opportunities

JAMA , Volume 180 (11) – Jun 16, 1962

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1962 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1962.03050240028006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THIRTY-FOUR YEARS AGO, Dr. Arthur Dean Bevan, then chairman of the Council on Medical Education and Hospital of the American Medical Association, pointed out that medicine is one of the great functions of modern civilization. He said: Medicine is in everyday contact with every individual in every community. Without modern scientific medicine, without modern public health service, our modern civilization would soon cease to exist. Great cities, such as London, New York, Paris and Chicago, would be impossible. They would soon rot away under great plagues as the larger centers of population did in the Middle Ages. Medical education and medical practice are not functions of the university and the medical profession alone; they are functions of modern civilization in which the entire community is vitally interested. That statement, so true in 1928, has even greater application in the world today. Now, the "entire community" is literally the whole world.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 16, 1962

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