Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Medical Commentary on China

Medical Commentary on China Abstract To the Editor. —The recent article by Dr Orient1 in the Archives on the unscientific nature of most Western medical commentaries on the People's Republic of China was most appropriate and timely. We seem to have adopted such an attitude of conciliation toward China that we have left our critical faculties behind when visiting, discussing, or writing about it. Our interpretation of Chinese medicine is often tacitly political rather than scientific. Many physicians are satisfied with second-hand information given by Chinese authorities rather than with direct observations and gathering data first hand.On a trip to China in December 1983, I participated in exchanges in four medical institutions with physicians and surgeons regarding clinical nutrition. At one of them I had a particular desire to gather data regarding the prevalence of hospital-associated malnutrition, which has been well documented in the United States.2 There are many reasons why the data References 1. Orient JM: A critique of Western medical commentary on the People's Republic of China. Arch Intern Med 1984;144:106-109.Crossref 2. Weinsier RL, Hunker EM, Krumdieck CL, et al: Hospital malnutrition: A prospective evaluation of general medical patients during the course of hospitalization. Am J Clin Nutr 1979;32:418-426. 3. Butterfield F: China: Alive in the Bitter Sea . New York, Times Books, 1982. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Medical Commentary on China

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —The recent article by Dr Orient1 in the Archives on the unscientific nature of most Western medical commentaries on the People's Republic of China was most appropriate and timely. We seem to have adopted such an attitude of conciliation toward China that we have left our critical faculties behind when visiting, discussing, or writing about it. Our interpretation of Chinese medicine is often tacitly political rather than scientific. Many physicians are...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/medical-commentary-on-china-CtYpJhBoU6
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1984.00350170263049
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —The recent article by Dr Orient1 in the Archives on the unscientific nature of most Western medical commentaries on the People's Republic of China was most appropriate and timely. We seem to have adopted such an attitude of conciliation toward China that we have left our critical faculties behind when visiting, discussing, or writing about it. Our interpretation of Chinese medicine is often tacitly political rather than scientific. Many physicians are satisfied with second-hand information given by Chinese authorities rather than with direct observations and gathering data first hand.On a trip to China in December 1983, I participated in exchanges in four medical institutions with physicians and surgeons regarding clinical nutrition. At one of them I had a particular desire to gather data regarding the prevalence of hospital-associated malnutrition, which has been well documented in the United States.2 There are many reasons why the data References 1. Orient JM: A critique of Western medical commentary on the People's Republic of China. Arch Intern Med 1984;144:106-109.Crossref 2. Weinsier RL, Hunker EM, Krumdieck CL, et al: Hospital malnutrition: A prospective evaluation of general medical patients during the course of hospitalization. Am J Clin Nutr 1979;32:418-426. 3. Butterfield F: China: Alive in the Bitter Sea . New York, Times Books, 1982.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1984

References