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Mechanism of Glaucoma Secondary to Increased Venous Pressure

Mechanism of Glaucoma Secondary to Increased Venous Pressure Abstract • Model experiments and mathematical analysis of intraocular pressure and blood flow show that as venous pressure is increased there is a rapidly increasing tendency for intraocular veins to collapse. Vein collapse slows blood flow markedly. We propose that the visual field loss in glaucoma secondary to elevated venous pressure is associated with intraocular vein collapse and retardation of intraocular blood flow. References 1. Spaeth GL: Pathogenesis of visual loss in patients with glaucoma: Pathologic and sociologic considerations . Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 1971;75:296-317. 2. Moses RA: Intraocular blood flow from analysis of angiograms . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1983;24:354-360. 3. Fry DL, Thomas LJ, Greenfield JC Jr: Flow in collapsible tubes , in Patel DJ, Vaishnav RN (eds): Basic Hemodynamics and Its Role in Disease Processes . Baltimore, University Park Press, 1980. 4. Riva CE, Sinclair SH, Grunwald JE: Autoregulation of retinal circulation in response to decrease of perfusion pressure . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1981;21:34-38. 5. Grunwald JE, Sinclair SH, Riva CE: Autoregulation of the retinal circulation in response to decrease of intraocular pressure below normal . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1982;23:124-127. 6. Grunwald JE, Riva CE, Stone RA, et al: Retinal autoregulation in open-angle glaucoma . Ophthalmology 1984;91:1690-1694.Crossref 7. Goldor H, Gay AJ: Chorioretinal vascular occlusions with latex microspheres (a long-term study): Part II . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1967;1:51-58. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Mechanism of Glaucoma Secondary to Increased Venous Pressure

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1985.01050110095034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Model experiments and mathematical analysis of intraocular pressure and blood flow show that as venous pressure is increased there is a rapidly increasing tendency for intraocular veins to collapse. Vein collapse slows blood flow markedly. We propose that the visual field loss in glaucoma secondary to elevated venous pressure is associated with intraocular vein collapse and retardation of intraocular blood flow. References 1. Spaeth GL: Pathogenesis of visual loss in patients with glaucoma: Pathologic and sociologic considerations . Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 1971;75:296-317. 2. Moses RA: Intraocular blood flow from analysis of angiograms . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1983;24:354-360. 3. Fry DL, Thomas LJ, Greenfield JC Jr: Flow in collapsible tubes , in Patel DJ, Vaishnav RN (eds): Basic Hemodynamics and Its Role in Disease Processes . Baltimore, University Park Press, 1980. 4. Riva CE, Sinclair SH, Grunwald JE: Autoregulation of retinal circulation in response to decrease of perfusion pressure . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1981;21:34-38. 5. Grunwald JE, Sinclair SH, Riva CE: Autoregulation of the retinal circulation in response to decrease of intraocular pressure below normal . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1982;23:124-127. 6. Grunwald JE, Riva CE, Stone RA, et al: Retinal autoregulation in open-angle glaucoma . Ophthalmology 1984;91:1690-1694.Crossref 7. Goldor H, Gay AJ: Chorioretinal vascular occlusions with latex microspheres (a long-term study): Part II . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1967;1:51-58.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1985

References