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Measuring the Long-term Impact of War-Zone Military Service Across Generations and Changing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Definitions

Measuring the Long-term Impact of War-Zone Military Service Across Generations and Changing... Opinion EDITORIAL Measuring the Long-term Impact of War-Zone Military Service Across Generations and Changing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Definitions Charles W. Hoge, MD The neuropsychiatric impact of World War I, World War II, nal NVVRS cohort offers a unique window into the psychiat- and the Korean War was described in terms such as shell ric health of these veterans 40 years after the war’s end. No shock, neurasthenia, psychoneurosis, and battle fatigue. For the other study has achieved this quality of longitudinal informa- Vietnam generation, read- tion, and the sobering findings tell us as much about the Viet- justment problems were ini- nam generation as about the lifelong impact of combat ser- Related article page 875 tially attributed to alcohol or vice in general, relevant to all generations. Like the NVVRS, substance use, followed by growing acceptance of persistent the NVVLS comes at a historic watershed after 14 years of war stress responses or post-Vietnam syndrome. In 1979, the US in Iraq and Afghanistan and shortly after publication of DSM-5, Congress directed the Veterans Administration to establish the first substantial revision of the PTSD definition since Readjustment Counseling Centers (Vet Centers) to provide DSM-III-R (including marked wording changes, restructur- community-based http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

Measuring the Long-term Impact of War-Zone Military Service Across Generations and Changing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Definitions

JAMA Psychiatry , Volume 72 (9) – Sep 1, 2015

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.1066
pmid
26200673
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Measuring the Long-term Impact of War-Zone Military Service Across Generations and Changing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Definitions Charles W. Hoge, MD The neuropsychiatric impact of World War I, World War II, nal NVVRS cohort offers a unique window into the psychiat- and the Korean War was described in terms such as shell ric health of these veterans 40 years after the war’s end. No shock, neurasthenia, psychoneurosis, and battle fatigue. For the other study has achieved this quality of longitudinal informa- Vietnam generation, read- tion, and the sobering findings tell us as much about the Viet- justment problems were ini- nam generation as about the lifelong impact of combat ser- Related article page 875 tially attributed to alcohol or vice in general, relevant to all generations. Like the NVVRS, substance use, followed by growing acceptance of persistent the NVVLS comes at a historic watershed after 14 years of war stress responses or post-Vietnam syndrome. In 1979, the US in Iraq and Afghanistan and shortly after publication of DSM-5, Congress directed the Veterans Administration to establish the first substantial revision of the PTSD definition since Readjustment Counseling Centers (Vet Centers) to provide DSM-III-R (including marked wording changes, restructur- community-based

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 2015

References