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Measuring Free Radicals

Measuring Free Radicals For several years, researchers worldwide have speculated that antioxidant vitamins may protect healthy people or those with low reserves of natural antioxidant compounds against cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other conditions. Yet definite conclusions have been elusive because no reliable technique exists to measure free radical activity in the body or determine if vitamins counteract the damage. But in the March 31 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia, Pa, describe a new, noninvasive technique to measure free radical activity. They have identified an isoprostane called IPF2α-I as a stable, abundant by-product of arachidonic acid that free radicals oxidize in the body. The by-product is easily detected in the urine, they report. In a previous study, the researchers found high levels of IPF2α-I in atherosclerotic plaque removed from the neck arteries of patients who underwent endarterectomy. "Can antioxidants contribute significantly to the prevention or treatment of disease? This new test will allow us to answer these and other important questions about free radical activity in individuals," said Garrett A. FitzGerald, MD, chair of pharmacology and senior author of the study. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Measuring Free Radicals

JAMA , Volume 279 (16) – Apr 22, 1998

Measuring Free Radicals

Abstract

For several years, researchers worldwide have speculated that antioxidant vitamins may protect healthy people or those with low reserves of natural antioxidant compounds against cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other conditions. Yet definite conclusions have been elusive because no reliable technique exists to measure free radical activity in the body or determine if vitamins counteract the damage. But in the March 31 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.279.16.1249-JQU80001-2-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For several years, researchers worldwide have speculated that antioxidant vitamins may protect healthy people or those with low reserves of natural antioxidant compounds against cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other conditions. Yet definite conclusions have been elusive because no reliable technique exists to measure free radical activity in the body or determine if vitamins counteract the damage. But in the March 31 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia, Pa, describe a new, noninvasive technique to measure free radical activity. They have identified an isoprostane called IPF2α-I as a stable, abundant by-product of arachidonic acid that free radicals oxidize in the body. The by-product is easily detected in the urine, they report. In a previous study, the researchers found high levels of IPF2α-I in atherosclerotic plaque removed from the neck arteries of patients who underwent endarterectomy. "Can antioxidants contribute significantly to the prevention or treatment of disease? This new test will allow us to answer these and other important questions about free radical activity in individuals," said Garrett A. FitzGerald, MD, chair of pharmacology and senior author of the study.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 22, 1998

Keywords: free radicals

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