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Measles Outbreak—Guam, 1994

Measles Outbreak—Guam, 1994 Abstract ONE OF the largest outbreaks of measles in the United States and its territories since 1992 occurred in Guam during 1994. From February 8 through June 25, 1994, a total of 280 suspected, probable, or confirmed cases of measles were reported to the Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services (GDPH). Of these cases, 228 were considered confirmed, including 47 serologically confirmed cases. This report summarizes findings from the investigation of these 228 cases.* The index case occurred in an 8-month-old child who developed a rash on February 7,1994. This case could not be epidemiologically linked to a previous measles outbreak in Guam (22 cases) that occurred during October 20-December 26, 1993; that outbreak was initiated by an imported case from the Republic of Palau. In addition, genetic sequencing of viral isolates indicated that viruses that had circulated in Palau and in Guam were different. The outbreak peaked in References 1. The following is a pre-publication draft of articles from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report dated September 15, 1995. Late-breaking articles and final editorial revisions are not included; therefore, these articles should be considered preliminary, and not to be released to the public. --CDC 2. The second dose of measles vaccine is routinely recommended at entry to primary or secondary school but may be given at earlier ages provided it is administered at least 30 days after the first dose, and both doses are given after age 12 months. 3. Jenks PJ, Caul EO, Roome APCH. Maternally derived measles immunity in children of naturally infected and vaccinated mothers . Epidemiol Infect 1988;101:473-6.Crossref 4. Lennon J, Black FL. Maternally derived measles immunity in era of vaccine-protected mothers . J Pediatr 1986;108:671-6.Crossref 5. CDC. Measles prevention: supplementary statement . MMWR 1989;38:11-4. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Measles Outbreak—Guam, 1994

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 131 (11) – Nov 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1995.01690230029002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract ONE OF the largest outbreaks of measles in the United States and its territories since 1992 occurred in Guam during 1994. From February 8 through June 25, 1994, a total of 280 suspected, probable, or confirmed cases of measles were reported to the Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services (GDPH). Of these cases, 228 were considered confirmed, including 47 serologically confirmed cases. This report summarizes findings from the investigation of these 228 cases.* The index case occurred in an 8-month-old child who developed a rash on February 7,1994. This case could not be epidemiologically linked to a previous measles outbreak in Guam (22 cases) that occurred during October 20-December 26, 1993; that outbreak was initiated by an imported case from the Republic of Palau. In addition, genetic sequencing of viral isolates indicated that viruses that had circulated in Palau and in Guam were different. The outbreak peaked in References 1. The following is a pre-publication draft of articles from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report dated September 15, 1995. Late-breaking articles and final editorial revisions are not included; therefore, these articles should be considered preliminary, and not to be released to the public. --CDC 2. The second dose of measles vaccine is routinely recommended at entry to primary or secondary school but may be given at earlier ages provided it is administered at least 30 days after the first dose, and both doses are given after age 12 months. 3. Jenks PJ, Caul EO, Roome APCH. Maternally derived measles immunity in children of naturally infected and vaccinated mothers . Epidemiol Infect 1988;101:473-6.Crossref 4. Lennon J, Black FL. Maternally derived measles immunity in era of vaccine-protected mothers . J Pediatr 1986;108:671-6.Crossref 5. CDC. Measles prevention: supplementary statement . MMWR 1989;38:11-4.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1995

References