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McLean Course in Electrodiagnostic Medicine

McLean Course in Electrodiagnostic Medicine by Christopher J. Visco, MD, and Gary P. Chimes, MD, PhD, 248 pp, with illus, $45, ISBN 978-1-933864-63-1, New York, NY, Demos Medical Publishing, 2010. Electrodiagnostic medicine (EM) is an integral part of neurology and physiatry. It is an extension of the clinical diagnosis and is vital for evaluating patients with any form of peripheral neuromuscular disorder. Neurologists and physiatrists must become well versed in the technique, application, and interpretation of electrophysiologic studies before they can perform studies independently. Not all neurology and physiatry trainees pursue a fellowship in EM, and hence exposure to and training in EM are vital during residency. The McLean course in EM was developed at the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in West Orange, New Jersey, in 2004 by the late Dr James McLean during his residency training. His purpose was to create a structured curriculum for the first-year residents to help them understand the concepts of EM so that they would become more comfortable with the basic techniques. This curriculum has since been modified and is now adopted as part of the official curriculum at the Kessler Institute, is taught at the annual Association of Academic Physiatrists meeting, and is part of the curriculum at various other teaching institutions. The goal of this book is to provide a guide to the basics of EM for residents and all others who are beginning to study this field of medicine. The book is broken down into sections, starting with basic instrumentation and concepts. This is followed by sections on basic techniques of nerve conduction studies and electromyography. This is, in turn, followed by an advanced course in which there are simplified descriptions of technique and applications in various mononeuropathies, cervical and lumbosacral radiculopathy, plexopathy, polyneuropathy, blink reflex, neuromuscular junction disorders, motor neuron disease, and myopathy. Each chapter is nice and short, with illustrations, tables, and photographs, all of which make the material very easy to follow. The points are well described using bulleted lists, which make it easy to read. Normative values are provided where necessary. A very nice feature of this book is that each chapter is followed by multiple-choice questions, and the answers for these questions are supplied at the end of the book. These answers have explanations that reinforce learning. There is also a nice list of references for additional reading in EM, which readers can use to gain further in-depth knowledge. The book ends with a section on assessment systems for residents and goals for trainees at various levels of their residency. In addition, this part of the book provides objective measures for trainees too, so they can see where they stand at the end of each year of training. Overall, this is a nice handbook with simplified concepts in EM, which would be quite useful to residents in physiatry and neurology, especially at the beginning of their training. One of the weak points of this book, however, is that there are some errors, most likely typographical, in the text. However, this is a minor quibble that does not diminish the importance or the quality of this handbook. Drs Visco and Chimes' book does serve its intended purpose, which is to offer a simple understanding of the basics of EM to trainees. It is handy, easy to read, and seems practical. Prose ★★★ Illustrations ★★★ Science ★★ Usefulness ★★★ Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Trivedi, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390 (jaya.trivedi@utsouthwestern.edu). Financial Disclosure: None reported. Funding/Support: Dr Trivedi has received support from National Institutes of Health grant U54RR19482 and R01NS045686-02. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

McLean Course in Electrodiagnostic Medicine

Archives of Neurology , Volume 69 (9) – Sep 1, 2012

McLean Course in Electrodiagnostic Medicine

Abstract

by Christopher J. Visco, MD, and Gary P. Chimes, MD, PhD, 248 pp, with illus, $45, ISBN 978-1-933864-63-1, New York, NY, Demos Medical Publishing, 2010. Electrodiagnostic medicine (EM) is an integral part of neurology and physiatry. It is an extension of the clinical diagnosis and is vital for evaluating patients with any form of peripheral neuromuscular disorder. Neurologists and physiatrists must become well versed in the technique, application, and interpretation of electrophysiologic...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneurol.2012.1705
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

by Christopher J. Visco, MD, and Gary P. Chimes, MD, PhD, 248 pp, with illus, $45, ISBN 978-1-933864-63-1, New York, NY, Demos Medical Publishing, 2010. Electrodiagnostic medicine (EM) is an integral part of neurology and physiatry. It is an extension of the clinical diagnosis and is vital for evaluating patients with any form of peripheral neuromuscular disorder. Neurologists and physiatrists must become well versed in the technique, application, and interpretation of electrophysiologic studies before they can perform studies independently. Not all neurology and physiatry trainees pursue a fellowship in EM, and hence exposure to and training in EM are vital during residency. The McLean course in EM was developed at the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in West Orange, New Jersey, in 2004 by the late Dr James McLean during his residency training. His purpose was to create a structured curriculum for the first-year residents to help them understand the concepts of EM so that they would become more comfortable with the basic techniques. This curriculum has since been modified and is now adopted as part of the official curriculum at the Kessler Institute, is taught at the annual Association of Academic Physiatrists meeting, and is part of the curriculum at various other teaching institutions. The goal of this book is to provide a guide to the basics of EM for residents and all others who are beginning to study this field of medicine. The book is broken down into sections, starting with basic instrumentation and concepts. This is followed by sections on basic techniques of nerve conduction studies and electromyography. This is, in turn, followed by an advanced course in which there are simplified descriptions of technique and applications in various mononeuropathies, cervical and lumbosacral radiculopathy, plexopathy, polyneuropathy, blink reflex, neuromuscular junction disorders, motor neuron disease, and myopathy. Each chapter is nice and short, with illustrations, tables, and photographs, all of which make the material very easy to follow. The points are well described using bulleted lists, which make it easy to read. Normative values are provided where necessary. A very nice feature of this book is that each chapter is followed by multiple-choice questions, and the answers for these questions are supplied at the end of the book. These answers have explanations that reinforce learning. There is also a nice list of references for additional reading in EM, which readers can use to gain further in-depth knowledge. The book ends with a section on assessment systems for residents and goals for trainees at various levels of their residency. In addition, this part of the book provides objective measures for trainees too, so they can see where they stand at the end of each year of training. Overall, this is a nice handbook with simplified concepts in EM, which would be quite useful to residents in physiatry and neurology, especially at the beginning of their training. One of the weak points of this book, however, is that there are some errors, most likely typographical, in the text. However, this is a minor quibble that does not diminish the importance or the quality of this handbook. Drs Visco and Chimes' book does serve its intended purpose, which is to offer a simple understanding of the basics of EM to trainees. It is handy, easy to read, and seems practical. Prose ★★★ Illustrations ★★★ Science ★★ Usefulness ★★★ Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Trivedi, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390 (jaya.trivedi@utsouthwestern.edu). Financial Disclosure: None reported. Funding/Support: Dr Trivedi has received support from National Institutes of Health grant U54RR19482 and R01NS045686-02.

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 2012

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