Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Maternal Overweight and Obesity and the Risk of Congenital Anomalies

Maternal Overweight and Obesity and the Risk of Congenital Anomalies REVIEW Maternal Overweight and Obesity and the Risk of Congenital Anomalies A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Katherine J. Stothard, PhD Context Evidence suggests an association between maternal obesity and some con- Peter W. G. Tennant, MSc genital anomalies. Ruth Bell, MD Objective To assess current evidence of the association between maternal over- weight, maternal obesity, and congenital anomaly. Judith Rankin, PhD Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Scopus ( January 1966 through May 2008) were searched for English-language studies using a list of keywords. Reference BESITY IS A MAJOR PUBLIC lists from relevant review articles were also searched. health and economic con- Study Selection Observational studies with an estimate of prepregnancy or early cern. Worldwide, an esti- pregnancy weight or body mass index (BMI) and data on congenital anomalies were Omated 1.6 billion adults considered. Of 1944 potential articles, 39 were included in the systematic review and (aged 15 years and older) were over- 18 in the meta-analysis. weight (body mass index [BMI] Data Extraction and Synthesis Information was extracted on study design, 25-30, calculated as weight in kilo- quality, participants, congenital anomaly groups and subtypes, and risk estimates. grams divided by height in meters Pooled odds ratios (ORs) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Maternal Overweight and Obesity and the Risk of Congenital Anomalies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/maternal-overweight-and-obesity-and-the-risk-of-congenital-anomalies-7wEI5gdf0w
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2009.113
pmid
19211471
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW Maternal Overweight and Obesity and the Risk of Congenital Anomalies A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Katherine J. Stothard, PhD Context Evidence suggests an association between maternal obesity and some con- Peter W. G. Tennant, MSc genital anomalies. Ruth Bell, MD Objective To assess current evidence of the association between maternal over- weight, maternal obesity, and congenital anomaly. Judith Rankin, PhD Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Scopus ( January 1966 through May 2008) were searched for English-language studies using a list of keywords. Reference BESITY IS A MAJOR PUBLIC lists from relevant review articles were also searched. health and economic con- Study Selection Observational studies with an estimate of prepregnancy or early cern. Worldwide, an esti- pregnancy weight or body mass index (BMI) and data on congenital anomalies were Omated 1.6 billion adults considered. Of 1944 potential articles, 39 were included in the systematic review and (aged 15 years and older) were over- 18 in the meta-analysis. weight (body mass index [BMI] Data Extraction and Synthesis Information was extracted on study design, 25-30, calculated as weight in kilo- quality, participants, congenital anomaly groups and subtypes, and risk estimates. grams divided by height in meters Pooled odds ratios (ORs)

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 11, 2009

References