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MASTOIDITIS WITHOUT APPARENT OTITIS MEDIA

MASTOIDITIS WITHOUT APPARENT OTITIS MEDIA Abstract The infrequent occurrence of mastoiditis without apparent otitis media has prompted the following report of two cases. They are indeed interesting, and I hope that by adding to those already reported there may be a better understanding of this unusual type of infection. ETIOLOGY AND SYMPTOMS The term primary mastoiditis, as it has been used to designate this type of infection, is misleading, since it implies an involvement primarily in the mastoid and not secondary to an infection that has passed through the eustachian tube and middle ear. It is generally agreed that the infection enters the mastoid by this route. Involvement of the middle ear may produce no symptoms or signs. The infection spreads to the mastoid through the aditus ad antrum, and if this passage is small, it becomes occluded. The infection in the middle ear subsides because of drainage through the eustachian tube, and that in References 1. Hempstead, B. E.: Mastoiditis Without Apparent Involvement of the Middle Ear , J. A. M. A. 81:1266-1268 ( (Oct. 13) ) 1923.Crossref 2. Heggie, N. M., and Knauer, W. J.: Mastoiditis Without Apparent Involvement of the Middle Ear , J. A. M. A. 84:1044 ( (March 29) ) 1924.Crossref 3. Wagers, A. J.: Acute Mastoiditis, Apparently Primary, in an Infant Seven Months of Age , Laryngoscope 34:453 ( (June) ) 1924. 4. Diehl, J. E.: Report of a Case of Mastoiditis, Epidural Abscess with Apparently No Middle Ear Involvement , Virginia M. Month. 51:223 ( (July) ) 1924. 5. Kopetzky, S. J., and Almour, R. A.: Report of Three Cases of Primary Acute Mastoiditis , Laryngoscope 35:774-777 ( (Oct.) ) 1925Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

MASTOIDITIS WITHOUT APPARENT OTITIS MEDIA

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 3 (5) – May 1, 1926

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1926 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1926.00580010463004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The infrequent occurrence of mastoiditis without apparent otitis media has prompted the following report of two cases. They are indeed interesting, and I hope that by adding to those already reported there may be a better understanding of this unusual type of infection. ETIOLOGY AND SYMPTOMS The term primary mastoiditis, as it has been used to designate this type of infection, is misleading, since it implies an involvement primarily in the mastoid and not secondary to an infection that has passed through the eustachian tube and middle ear. It is generally agreed that the infection enters the mastoid by this route. Involvement of the middle ear may produce no symptoms or signs. The infection spreads to the mastoid through the aditus ad antrum, and if this passage is small, it becomes occluded. The infection in the middle ear subsides because of drainage through the eustachian tube, and that in References 1. Hempstead, B. E.: Mastoiditis Without Apparent Involvement of the Middle Ear , J. A. M. A. 81:1266-1268 ( (Oct. 13) ) 1923.Crossref 2. Heggie, N. M., and Knauer, W. J.: Mastoiditis Without Apparent Involvement of the Middle Ear , J. A. M. A. 84:1044 ( (March 29) ) 1924.Crossref 3. Wagers, A. J.: Acute Mastoiditis, Apparently Primary, in an Infant Seven Months of Age , Laryngoscope 34:453 ( (June) ) 1924. 4. Diehl, J. E.: Report of a Case of Mastoiditis, Epidural Abscess with Apparently No Middle Ear Involvement , Virginia M. Month. 51:223 ( (July) ) 1924. 5. Kopetzky, S. J., and Almour, R. A.: Report of Three Cases of Primary Acute Mastoiditis , Laryngoscope 35:774-777 ( (Oct.) ) 1925Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1926

References