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Massive-Dose Arsenotherapy of Early Syphilis by Intravenous Drip Method: Five-Day Treatment

Massive-Dose Arsenotherapy of Early Syphilis by Intravenous Drip Method: Five-Day Treatment Abstract The treatment of syphilis with mercury over the years proved wholly unsatisfactory because such "cures" as it produced were principally symptomatic and rarely, if ever, biologic. With the introduction of the trivalent organic arsenicals the situation changed radically and the much-hoped-for goal of a true biologic cure became a reality. In the experimental animal it was demonstrated that a few doses of the organic arsenicals could completely destroy the treponemes and thus bring about a biologic cure. It was further found that in man even a single adequate dose of the arsenical was capable of curing yaws, a disease closely related to syphilis. Unfortunately, this desideratum was unattainable in human syphilis since large doses, frequently repeated, were necessary. This often resulted in serious toxic reactions and in relapse. This situation soon led to the abandonment of such intensive methods of treatment. In consequence many prolonged schemes of References 1. The original work in 1933 was made possible through the trustees of the Mount Sinai Hospital and a special gift from the late Mr. Ernst Rosenfeld. The later investigations were supervised by a committee appointed by the then Commissioner of Health, Dr. John L. Rice. In addition to the original investigators, the committee included Commissioner Rice; Dr. Charles Lieb, Professor of Pharmacology at Columbia University: Senior Surgeon John F. Mahoney, of the U. S. Public Health Service; Dr. Walter Clarke, Executive Director of the American Social Hygiene Association; Dr. Theodore Rosenthal, Chief of the Bureau of Social Hygiene of the New York City Department of Health; Dr. Eugene DuBois; Dr. Walter W. Palmer; Dr. George Baehr; Dr. Bruce Webster, and Dr. Evan Thomas. Funds were provided by the New York Foundation and the Friedsam Foundation through the Committee on Neighborhood Health Development, Inc. 2. It seems only fair for me to point out that Dr. Leifer personally treated all the patients in these series, and that he continued follow-up observations of most of them for a good many years.— http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Massive-Dose Arsenotherapy of Early Syphilis by Intravenous Drip Method: Five-Day Treatment

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550050060010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The treatment of syphilis with mercury over the years proved wholly unsatisfactory because such "cures" as it produced were principally symptomatic and rarely, if ever, biologic. With the introduction of the trivalent organic arsenicals the situation changed radically and the much-hoped-for goal of a true biologic cure became a reality. In the experimental animal it was demonstrated that a few doses of the organic arsenicals could completely destroy the treponemes and thus bring about a biologic cure. It was further found that in man even a single adequate dose of the arsenical was capable of curing yaws, a disease closely related to syphilis. Unfortunately, this desideratum was unattainable in human syphilis since large doses, frequently repeated, were necessary. This often resulted in serious toxic reactions and in relapse. This situation soon led to the abandonment of such intensive methods of treatment. In consequence many prolonged schemes of References 1. The original work in 1933 was made possible through the trustees of the Mount Sinai Hospital and a special gift from the late Mr. Ernst Rosenfeld. The later investigations were supervised by a committee appointed by the then Commissioner of Health, Dr. John L. Rice. In addition to the original investigators, the committee included Commissioner Rice; Dr. Charles Lieb, Professor of Pharmacology at Columbia University: Senior Surgeon John F. Mahoney, of the U. S. Public Health Service; Dr. Walter Clarke, Executive Director of the American Social Hygiene Association; Dr. Theodore Rosenthal, Chief of the Bureau of Social Hygiene of the New York City Department of Health; Dr. Eugene DuBois; Dr. Walter W. Palmer; Dr. George Baehr; Dr. Bruce Webster, and Dr. Evan Thomas. Funds were provided by the New York Foundation and the Friedsam Foundation through the Committee on Neighborhood Health Development, Inc. 2. It seems only fair for me to point out that Dr. Leifer personally treated all the patients in these series, and that he continued follow-up observations of most of them for a good many years.—

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1956

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