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Marginal (Tarsal) Ectropion

Marginal (Tarsal) Ectropion Abstract Marginal (tarsal) ectropion is a clinical entity characterized by lower lid eversion which is limited to the tarsal-containing portion only. It differs from ordinary senile ectropion in that (1) eversion does not progress beyond the tarsus and (2) there is no relaxation of the tissues of the lid below the tarsus. It is similar to senile ectropion in that it is seen only in middle and old age and it may be unilateral or bilateral. In the early stages there is slight eversion of the punctum with epiphora giving the appearance of an early ordinary senile ectropion (Fig. 1). However, even a cursory examination will show that there is no laxity of the lid tissues; in fact, the skin of the lid is tense and has no "give." In the advanced stages the upper portion is everted on the lower part of the lid like a cuff on a sleeve References 1. Duke-Elder, S.: Text-Book of Ophthalmology , St. Louis, The C. V. Mosby Company, Vol. 5, 1952, p. 5188. 2. Fox, S. A.: Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1958, p. 161. 3. Callahan, A.: Senile Ectropion , Am. J. Ophth. 38:787, 1954. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1960.00950020662006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Marginal (tarsal) ectropion is a clinical entity characterized by lower lid eversion which is limited to the tarsal-containing portion only. It differs from ordinary senile ectropion in that (1) eversion does not progress beyond the tarsus and (2) there is no relaxation of the tissues of the lid below the tarsus. It is similar to senile ectropion in that it is seen only in middle and old age and it may be unilateral or bilateral. In the early stages there is slight eversion of the punctum with epiphora giving the appearance of an early ordinary senile ectropion (Fig. 1). However, even a cursory examination will show that there is no laxity of the lid tissues; in fact, the skin of the lid is tense and has no "give." In the advanced stages the upper portion is everted on the lower part of the lid like a cuff on a sleeve References 1. Duke-Elder, S.: Text-Book of Ophthalmology , St. Louis, The C. V. Mosby Company, Vol. 5, 1952, p. 5188. 2. Fox, S. A.: Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1958, p. 161. 3. Callahan, A.: Senile Ectropion , Am. J. Ophth. 38:787, 1954.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1960

References

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