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March Myoglobinemia-Reply

March Myoglobinemia-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply. —We did not conclude that intensive physical conditioning programs cause chronic renal function deterioration. According to our results, persistent myoglobinemia may lead to a deterioration in renal function, but not to chronic renal failure. Our recruits were followed up for a long period and we have noticed a gradual improvement in their renal function.It is true that millions of people undergo physical training, but the severity of the conditions vary greatly from one region to another.Dr Knochel is right in saying that acute renal failure caused by exertional rhabdomyolysis is rare, but it has led other investigators to look for the change following regular exercise and, to our knowledge, there are few works in which such a population have been followed for any prolonged period.Our conclusion is that prolonged, repetitive exertion is followed by a decrease in renal function, and we can compare that with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

March Myoglobinemia-Reply

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 143 (2) – Feb 1, 1983

March Myoglobinemia-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply. —We did not conclude that intensive physical conditioning programs cause chronic renal function deterioration. According to our results, persistent myoglobinemia may lead to a deterioration in renal function, but not to chronic renal failure. Our recruits were followed up for a long period and we have noticed a gradual improvement in...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1983.00350020220051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply. —We did not conclude that intensive physical conditioning programs cause chronic renal function deterioration. According to our results, persistent myoglobinemia may lead to a deterioration in renal function, but not to chronic renal failure. Our recruits were followed up for a long period and we have noticed a gradual improvement in their renal function.It is true that millions of people undergo physical training, but the severity of the conditions vary greatly from one region to another.Dr Knochel is right in saying that acute renal failure caused by exertional rhabdomyolysis is rare, but it has led other investigators to look for the change following regular exercise and, to our knowledge, there are few works in which such a population have been followed for any prolonged period.Our conclusion is that prolonged, repetitive exertion is followed by a decrease in renal function, and we can compare that with

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1983

There are no references for this article.