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Manual vs Device-Assisted CPR

Manual vs Device-Assisted CPR Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIALS of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Reconciling Apparently Contradictory Results come. Most individuals who sustain cardiac arrest prob- Roger J. Lewis, MD, PhD ably receive suboptimal CPR, especially during extended re- James T. Niemann, MD suscitation efforts. During the third or metabolic phase of cardiac arrest, suc- UT-OF-HOSPITAL SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH IS A cessful resuscitation becomes increasingly unlikely due to major health problem. According to Becker damage from global ischemia and the production of harm- et al, in summarizing the 2000 Pulse Confer- ful metabolic factors with reperfusion. The phase during Oence, “We lose more than 1000 lives each day which an intervention is applied may profoundly influence in the United States from sudden, unexpected death, a the likelihood of benefit. fatality rate comparable to the crash of two 747 aircraft In an effort to improve manual CPR, a number of CPR without survivors.” To make matters worse, current inter- devices have been developed and are in various stages of test- ventions for the treatment of nontraumatic cardiopulmo- 11 12,13 ing. In this issue of JAMA, 2 studies are reported com- nary arrest, conforming to a “chain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Manual vs Device-Assisted CPR

JAMA , Volume 295 (22) – Jun 14, 2006

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2006 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.295.22.2661
pmid
16772632
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIALS of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Reconciling Apparently Contradictory Results come. Most individuals who sustain cardiac arrest prob- Roger J. Lewis, MD, PhD ably receive suboptimal CPR, especially during extended re- James T. Niemann, MD suscitation efforts. During the third or metabolic phase of cardiac arrest, suc- UT-OF-HOSPITAL SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH IS A cessful resuscitation becomes increasingly unlikely due to major health problem. According to Becker damage from global ischemia and the production of harm- et al, in summarizing the 2000 Pulse Confer- ful metabolic factors with reperfusion. The phase during Oence, “We lose more than 1000 lives each day which an intervention is applied may profoundly influence in the United States from sudden, unexpected death, a the likelihood of benefit. fatality rate comparable to the crash of two 747 aircraft In an effort to improve manual CPR, a number of CPR without survivors.” To make matters worse, current inter- devices have been developed and are in various stages of test- ventions for the treatment of nontraumatic cardiopulmo- 11 12,13 ing. In this issue of JAMA, 2 studies are reported com- nary arrest, conforming to a “chain

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 14, 2006

References