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Manual of Pediatric Therapeutics

Manual of Pediatric Therapeutics This edition has 4 major sections: general principles in pediatric practice, acute/urgent care, a review of disorders by organ system, and a formulary. The first section is a succinctly stated review of the principles of "well" care for neonates, children, and adolescents. Not only are the obvious features of such care noted (such as pertinent physical findings, immunizations needed, and anticipatory guidance by age), but also the most common management issues by age. I found this section helpful in its discussion of such issues as documentation, medical orders, advocacy, managed care, and referrals and consultations. The section on the dying patient is excellent. The second section contains 5 chapters: fluids and electrolytes, antibiotics and infectious disorders, management of the sick newborn, emergency and intensive care, and poisonings. The chapter on antibiotics and infectious conditions is especially comprehensive. At nearly 90 pages, it covers antibiotics by drug class and indications for specific pathogens, and infections by anatomic site, etiology, evaluation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed. A special section covers infections that involve multiple organs, such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The authors provide a disclaimer that the information in the text was current at the time of publication. The authors mention that the antiretroviral didanosine is the preferred agent for monotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. However, monotherapy is not now recommended. The third section, the largest in the book, reviews disorders by organ system. For each organ system, common disorders are described with suggested historical information, physical findings, and laboratory evaluations to verify their presence. Etiologies are suggested and therapies are recommended. The authors make liberal use of tables. Especially useful are the subsection on the composition and indications for various blood components, the dermatology chapter, and the subsection on seizures. The chapter on developmental disabilities and specialized health care needs underscores the common medical problems that children with these needs demonstrate and how best to care for them. The chapter on behavioral disorders summarizes the evaluation and treatment of both physical and psychiatric disorders and includes various treatment modalities such as behavioral interventions, educational interventions, psychotherapy, and medications for such behaviors as temper tantrums or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The fourth section is a formulary of commonly prescribed medications for children. Some medication listings include a "caution" section, noting drug interactions, administration procedures, and contraindications. Readers who need more information on a given topic should consult a standard pediatric textbook. Although some might dislike a spiral-bound paperback because of the possibility of damage to the covers with repeated use, I did not find this to be a problem. Editor John W. Graef, MD, and his contributors at the Children's Hospital in Boston, Mass, are to be commended. Although the entire manual is ideal for medical students during their pediatric clerkships and pediatric house officers, seasoned pediatricians and family practitioners will also find it to be a valuable addition to their libraries. The manual succeeds in covering material in a concise yet user-friendly format that is informative and engaging. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

Manual of Pediatric Therapeutics

Abstract

This edition has 4 major sections: general principles in pediatric practice, acute/urgent care, a review of disorders by organ system, and a formulary. The first section is a succinctly stated review of the principles of "well" care for neonates, children, and adolescents. Not only are the obvious features of such care noted (such as pertinent physical findings, immunizations needed, and anticipatory guidance by age), but also the most common management issues by age. I found this...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.152.8.829
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This edition has 4 major sections: general principles in pediatric practice, acute/urgent care, a review of disorders by organ system, and a formulary. The first section is a succinctly stated review of the principles of "well" care for neonates, children, and adolescents. Not only are the obvious features of such care noted (such as pertinent physical findings, immunizations needed, and anticipatory guidance by age), but also the most common management issues by age. I found this section helpful in its discussion of such issues as documentation, medical orders, advocacy, managed care, and referrals and consultations. The section on the dying patient is excellent. The second section contains 5 chapters: fluids and electrolytes, antibiotics and infectious disorders, management of the sick newborn, emergency and intensive care, and poisonings. The chapter on antibiotics and infectious conditions is especially comprehensive. At nearly 90 pages, it covers antibiotics by drug class and indications for specific pathogens, and infections by anatomic site, etiology, evaluation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed. A special section covers infections that involve multiple organs, such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The authors provide a disclaimer that the information in the text was current at the time of publication. The authors mention that the antiretroviral didanosine is the preferred agent for monotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. However, monotherapy is not now recommended. The third section, the largest in the book, reviews disorders by organ system. For each organ system, common disorders are described with suggested historical information, physical findings, and laboratory evaluations to verify their presence. Etiologies are suggested and therapies are recommended. The authors make liberal use of tables. Especially useful are the subsection on the composition and indications for various blood components, the dermatology chapter, and the subsection on seizures. The chapter on developmental disabilities and specialized health care needs underscores the common medical problems that children with these needs demonstrate and how best to care for them. The chapter on behavioral disorders summarizes the evaluation and treatment of both physical and psychiatric disorders and includes various treatment modalities such as behavioral interventions, educational interventions, psychotherapy, and medications for such behaviors as temper tantrums or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The fourth section is a formulary of commonly prescribed medications for children. Some medication listings include a "caution" section, noting drug interactions, administration procedures, and contraindications. Readers who need more information on a given topic should consult a standard pediatric textbook. Although some might dislike a spiral-bound paperback because of the possibility of damage to the covers with repeated use, I did not find this to be a problem. Editor John W. Graef, MD, and his contributors at the Children's Hospital in Boston, Mass, are to be commended. Although the entire manual is ideal for medical students during their pediatric clerkships and pediatric house officers, seasoned pediatricians and family practitioners will also find it to be a valuable addition to their libraries. The manual succeeds in covering material in a concise yet user-friendly format that is informative and engaging.

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1998

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