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Manual of Endoscopic Lacrimaland Orbital Surgery

Manual of Endoscopic Lacrimaland Orbital Surgery One of the most exciting developments in oculoplastics has been theincreased use of endoscopic techniques for orbital and lacrimal surgery. Theoverlap between otolaryngology and ophthalmology does have historical roots,and endonasal surgery enhances this relationship. Nevertheless, orbital andlacrimal endoscopy are challenging to learn, and published reports as wellas personal communications reveal high variance in outcomes. Hence, many oculoplasticsurgeons are frustrated with suboptimal results and time-consuming learningcurves. And the overlap with otolaryngology may be difficult to manage, especiallyin a private practice setting. Dr John Woog, an experienced and highly respected oculoplastic surgeon,has produced a very readable, succinct book and CD-ROM on the use of endoscopyin lacrimal and orbital surgery. This book targets both oculoplastic surgeonswho would like to expand their endoscopic repertoire and possibly otolaryngologistswho may be interested in orbital and lacrimal disease. As a result, the bookbegins with basic information that would likely be skipped by many experiencedreaders. However, for surgeons in training and for nonophthalmologists, thisinformation would likely be very helpful. The volume begins with a well-written chapter on anatomy, here expandedto include more nasal anatomy than is usually found in oculoplastic texts.The next 7 short chapters cover the office evaluation and conventional externalsurgical management of lacrimal, orbital, and nasal disease in adults andchildren. Finally, chapters 8 through 15 deal with endoscopic approaches tothese same problems. The strength of the book lies in these final 8 chapters on endoscopy.There are 5 different chapters on different endoscopic techniques for lacrimalduct bypass surgeries, including the conventional endoscopic approach to dacryocystorhinostomyand conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy, a balloon-assisted technique, a modifiedendoscopic technique using a large ostium and mucosal flaps, and a chapteron pediatric dacryocystorhinostomy. Since nasal anatomy can make or breakthe endonasal approach, a chapter on sinus surgery and septoplasty is included.Several controversial subjects are touched on, such as the use of mitomycinC or the timing of silicone stent removal. However, these are not discussedin any great detail. Finally, the endoscopic approaches to orbital decompressionand fracture repair complete the book. One of the nicest features of the book is an accompanying CD-ROM withmovies of key points in several surgeries. Here, there is a definite focuson endonasal techniques. The resolution is adequate, and the videos are accompaniedby commentary. Dr Woog assembled an excellent collection of contributors, and he authoredor coauthored 7 of the 15 chapters. Nevertheless, the book has the feel ofa collection of manuscripts. Much of the introductory material in severalchapters is redundant, so each chapter can stand on its own, and the extensivereferences at the end of each chapter make this a great sourcebook for furtherinformation on the techniques used. Overall, this volume is a relatively inexpensive and well-written introductionto some of the more advanced techniques in lacrimal, and to a lesser extentorbital, surgery, edited and coauthored by a highly respected surgeon. Itsmain fault is redundancy, although as a result, each chapter is self-contained,making this an excellent reference book. The accompanying videos form a veryuseful adjunct. Residents, fellows, and practicing oculoplastic surgeons whoare interested in endoscopy would find this book a readable and very accessiblestarting point. Correspondence: Dr Kahana, Department of Ophthalmology and VisualScience, University of Wisconsin, 2880 University Ave, Madison, WI 53705 (alonkahana@earthlink.net). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Manual of Endoscopic Lacrimaland Orbital Surgery

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 122 (10) – Oct 1, 2004

Manual of Endoscopic Lacrimaland Orbital Surgery

Abstract

One of the most exciting developments in oculoplastics has been theincreased use of endoscopic techniques for orbital and lacrimal surgery. Theoverlap between otolaryngology and ophthalmology does have historical roots,and endonasal surgery enhances this relationship. Nevertheless, orbital andlacrimal endoscopy are challenging to learn, and published reports as wellas personal communications reveal high variance in outcomes. Hence, many oculoplasticsurgeons are frustrated with suboptimal...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.122.10.1576-a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the most exciting developments in oculoplastics has been theincreased use of endoscopic techniques for orbital and lacrimal surgery. Theoverlap between otolaryngology and ophthalmology does have historical roots,and endonasal surgery enhances this relationship. Nevertheless, orbital andlacrimal endoscopy are challenging to learn, and published reports as wellas personal communications reveal high variance in outcomes. Hence, many oculoplasticsurgeons are frustrated with suboptimal results and time-consuming learningcurves. And the overlap with otolaryngology may be difficult to manage, especiallyin a private practice setting. Dr John Woog, an experienced and highly respected oculoplastic surgeon,has produced a very readable, succinct book and CD-ROM on the use of endoscopyin lacrimal and orbital surgery. This book targets both oculoplastic surgeonswho would like to expand their endoscopic repertoire and possibly otolaryngologistswho may be interested in orbital and lacrimal disease. As a result, the bookbegins with basic information that would likely be skipped by many experiencedreaders. However, for surgeons in training and for nonophthalmologists, thisinformation would likely be very helpful. The volume begins with a well-written chapter on anatomy, here expandedto include more nasal anatomy than is usually found in oculoplastic texts.The next 7 short chapters cover the office evaluation and conventional externalsurgical management of lacrimal, orbital, and nasal disease in adults andchildren. Finally, chapters 8 through 15 deal with endoscopic approaches tothese same problems. The strength of the book lies in these final 8 chapters on endoscopy.There are 5 different chapters on different endoscopic techniques for lacrimalduct bypass surgeries, including the conventional endoscopic approach to dacryocystorhinostomyand conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy, a balloon-assisted technique, a modifiedendoscopic technique using a large ostium and mucosal flaps, and a chapteron pediatric dacryocystorhinostomy. Since nasal anatomy can make or breakthe endonasal approach, a chapter on sinus surgery and septoplasty is included.Several controversial subjects are touched on, such as the use of mitomycinC or the timing of silicone stent removal. However, these are not discussedin any great detail. Finally, the endoscopic approaches to orbital decompressionand fracture repair complete the book. One of the nicest features of the book is an accompanying CD-ROM withmovies of key points in several surgeries. Here, there is a definite focuson endonasal techniques. The resolution is adequate, and the videos are accompaniedby commentary. Dr Woog assembled an excellent collection of contributors, and he authoredor coauthored 7 of the 15 chapters. Nevertheless, the book has the feel ofa collection of manuscripts. Much of the introductory material in severalchapters is redundant, so each chapter can stand on its own, and the extensivereferences at the end of each chapter make this a great sourcebook for furtherinformation on the techniques used. Overall, this volume is a relatively inexpensive and well-written introductionto some of the more advanced techniques in lacrimal, and to a lesser extentorbital, surgery, edited and coauthored by a highly respected surgeon. Itsmain fault is redundancy, although as a result, each chapter is self-contained,making this an excellent reference book. The accompanying videos form a veryuseful adjunct. Residents, fellows, and practicing oculoplastic surgeons whoare interested in endoscopy would find this book a readable and very accessiblestarting point. Correspondence: Dr Kahana, Department of Ophthalmology and VisualScience, University of Wisconsin, 2880 University Ave, Madison, WI 53705 (alonkahana@earthlink.net).

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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