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Making Sense of Contrast Sensitivity Testing: Has Its Time Come?

Making Sense of Contrast Sensitivity Testing: Has Its Time Come? Abstract Strolling through the exhibits at the 1986 American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting, one could not help but be impressed by the number of devices being promoted for the measurement of contrast sensitivity function and glare disability. Handsomely suited salesmen spoke with glib authority about the validity, accuracy, and ease of operation of their products. The ophthalmic shopper could choose between computerized systems with sinusoidal gratings displayed on cathode ray tubes, wall charts, sleek automated glare testers, and hand-held interferometers with simulated glare sources. Advertising handouts pointed out that these are scientifically standardized testing systems to help the practitioner "justify and document the decision for cataract surgery." Needless to say, such claims arouse our interest, and at some of the booths potential customers literally queued up to see the merchandise. However, the practicing ophthalmologist must ask himself whether these devices have already become the new standard of diagnostic accuracy or whether References 1. Snellen H: Test-types for the determination of the acuteness of vision . Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 1869;15:199.Crossref 2. Proenza LM, Enoch JM, Jampolsky A: Clinical Applications of Visual Psychophysics . New York, Cambridge University Press, 1981. 3. Bodis-Wollner I: Detection of visual defects using the contrast sensitivity function . Int Ophthalmol Clin 1980;20:135-153.Crossref 4. Arden GB, Jacobson JJ: A simple grating test for contrast sensitivity: Preliminary results indicate value for screening in glaucoma . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1978;17:23-32. 5. Hess RF, Carney LG: Vision through an abnormal cornea: A pilot study of the relationship between visual loss from corneal distortion, corneal edema, keratoconus, and some allied corneal pathology . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1979;18:476-483. 6. Hess RF, Garner LF: The effect of corneal edema on visual function . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1977;16:5-13. 7. Carney LG: Visual loss in keratoconus . Arch Ophthalmol 1982;100:1282-1285.Crossref 8. Mannis MJ, Zadnik K, Johnson CA: The effect of penetrating keratoplasty on contrast sensitivity in keratoconus . Arch Ophthalmol 1984;102:1513-1516.Crossref 9. Hess R, Woo G: Vision through cataracts . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1978;17:428-434. 10. Zadnik K, Mannis MJ, Johnson CA: An analysis of contrast sensitivity in identical twins with keratoconus . Cornea 1984;3:99-103.Crossref 11. Keltner JL, Johnson CA: Current status of automated perimetry . Arch Ophthalmol 1986;104:347-349.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Making Sense of Contrast Sensitivity Testing: Has Its Time Come?

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 105 (5) – May 1, 1987

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1987.01060050045033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Strolling through the exhibits at the 1986 American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting, one could not help but be impressed by the number of devices being promoted for the measurement of contrast sensitivity function and glare disability. Handsomely suited salesmen spoke with glib authority about the validity, accuracy, and ease of operation of their products. The ophthalmic shopper could choose between computerized systems with sinusoidal gratings displayed on cathode ray tubes, wall charts, sleek automated glare testers, and hand-held interferometers with simulated glare sources. Advertising handouts pointed out that these are scientifically standardized testing systems to help the practitioner "justify and document the decision for cataract surgery." Needless to say, such claims arouse our interest, and at some of the booths potential customers literally queued up to see the merchandise. However, the practicing ophthalmologist must ask himself whether these devices have already become the new standard of diagnostic accuracy or whether References 1. Snellen H: Test-types for the determination of the acuteness of vision . Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 1869;15:199.Crossref 2. Proenza LM, Enoch JM, Jampolsky A: Clinical Applications of Visual Psychophysics . New York, Cambridge University Press, 1981. 3. Bodis-Wollner I: Detection of visual defects using the contrast sensitivity function . Int Ophthalmol Clin 1980;20:135-153.Crossref 4. Arden GB, Jacobson JJ: A simple grating test for contrast sensitivity: Preliminary results indicate value for screening in glaucoma . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1978;17:23-32. 5. Hess RF, Carney LG: Vision through an abnormal cornea: A pilot study of the relationship between visual loss from corneal distortion, corneal edema, keratoconus, and some allied corneal pathology . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1979;18:476-483. 6. Hess RF, Garner LF: The effect of corneal edema on visual function . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1977;16:5-13. 7. Carney LG: Visual loss in keratoconus . Arch Ophthalmol 1982;100:1282-1285.Crossref 8. Mannis MJ, Zadnik K, Johnson CA: The effect of penetrating keratoplasty on contrast sensitivity in keratoconus . Arch Ophthalmol 1984;102:1513-1516.Crossref 9. Hess R, Woo G: Vision through cataracts . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1978;17:428-434. 10. Zadnik K, Mannis MJ, Johnson CA: An analysis of contrast sensitivity in identical twins with keratoconus . Cornea 1984;3:99-103.Crossref 11. Keltner JL, Johnson CA: Current status of automated perimetry . Arch Ophthalmol 1986;104:347-349.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1987

References