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MACROGLOSSIA-Reply

MACROGLOSSIA-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dr. Rosenfeld's comments seem to create an erroneous impression that I have suggested partial glossectomy in the treatment of Down's syndrome, cretinism, or other syndromes of abnormal serotonin metabolism. I have followed the classification described by Colby et al, who have classified the causes of macroglossia into congenital or acquired. Down's syndrome and cretinism are not included in the group of congenital macroglossia, and, therefore, the question of my having suggested partial glossectomy in the treatment of Down's syndrome and cretinism does not arise. In fact, none of the patients reported in my article showed any evidence of either Down's syndrome or cretinism. As to his contention, which appears to be based mostly on as yet unpublished experimental work of Dr. Mary Coleman, that the apparent tongue protrusion in the syndromes of abnormal serotonin metabolism can be markedly reduced by restoring blood and CNS serotonin levels to normal, I must http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

MACROGLOSSIA-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dr. Rosenfeld's comments seem to create an erroneous impression that I have suggested partial glossectomy in the treatment of Down's syndrome, cretinism, or other syndromes of abnormal serotonin metabolism. I have followed the classification described by Colby et al, who have classified the causes of macroglossia into congenital or acquired....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1971 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1971.00770070573025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Dr. Rosenfeld's comments seem to create an erroneous impression that I have suggested partial glossectomy in the treatment of Down's syndrome, cretinism, or other syndromes of abnormal serotonin metabolism. I have followed the classification described by Colby et al, who have classified the causes of macroglossia into congenital or acquired. Down's syndrome and cretinism are not included in the group of congenital macroglossia, and, therefore, the question of my having suggested partial glossectomy in the treatment of Down's syndrome and cretinism does not arise. In fact, none of the patients reported in my article showed any evidence of either Down's syndrome or cretinism. As to his contention, which appears to be based mostly on as yet unpublished experimental work of Dr. Mary Coleman, that the apparent tongue protrusion in the syndromes of abnormal serotonin metabolism can be markedly reduced by restoring blood and CNS serotonin levels to normal, I must

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1971

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