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Lymphatic Pressures in Extremities of Dogs

Lymphatic Pressures in Extremities of Dogs Abstract In reviewing the literature concerning the peripheral lymphatic system, one discovers a relative lack of information with regard to its basic physiology, in terms of accurate measurements of peripheral intralymphatic pressure. In 1933, Drinker and Field1 reported tying a glass T-tube into a lymphatic lying below the popliteal lymph node of the dog, attaching the tube to a manometer and measuring pressure in centimeters of water. The dog's foot was attached to a rotator which flexed and extended the limb at a rate of 73 times/minute. The pressures which were measured under these conditions were as follows: 41 cm of water after ten minutes and 68 cm of water after 40 minutes of exercise. They recorded no intralymphatic pressure with the animal at rest. In 1932, McMaster and Hudack2 measured the pressure indirectly in the lymphatics of the mouse's ear as 2-4 cm of water. They rendered the References 1. Drinker, C. K., and Field, M. E.: Lymphatics, Lymph, and Tissue Fluid , Baltimore: The Williams & Wilkins Company, 1933. 2. Hudack, S., and McMaster, P. D.: The Permeability of the Wall of the Lymphatic Capillary , J Exp Med 56:223, 1932.Crossref 3. McMaster, P. D.: The Relative Pressures Within Cutaneous Lymphatic Capillaries and the Tissues , J Exp Med 86:293, 1947.Crossref 4. Blocker, T. G.; Lewis, S. R.; Smith, J. R.; Dunton, E. F.; Kirby, E. J.; and Meyer, J. V.: Lymphodynamics , Plast Reconstr Surg 25:337, 1960.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Lymphatic Pressures in Extremities of Dogs

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1963 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1963.01310170167029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In reviewing the literature concerning the peripheral lymphatic system, one discovers a relative lack of information with regard to its basic physiology, in terms of accurate measurements of peripheral intralymphatic pressure. In 1933, Drinker and Field1 reported tying a glass T-tube into a lymphatic lying below the popliteal lymph node of the dog, attaching the tube to a manometer and measuring pressure in centimeters of water. The dog's foot was attached to a rotator which flexed and extended the limb at a rate of 73 times/minute. The pressures which were measured under these conditions were as follows: 41 cm of water after ten minutes and 68 cm of water after 40 minutes of exercise. They recorded no intralymphatic pressure with the animal at rest. In 1932, McMaster and Hudack2 measured the pressure indirectly in the lymphatics of the mouse's ear as 2-4 cm of water. They rendered the References 1. Drinker, C. K., and Field, M. E.: Lymphatics, Lymph, and Tissue Fluid , Baltimore: The Williams & Wilkins Company, 1933. 2. Hudack, S., and McMaster, P. D.: The Permeability of the Wall of the Lymphatic Capillary , J Exp Med 56:223, 1932.Crossref 3. McMaster, P. D.: The Relative Pressures Within Cutaneous Lymphatic Capillaries and the Tissues , J Exp Med 86:293, 1947.Crossref 4. Blocker, T. G.; Lewis, S. R.; Smith, J. R.; Dunton, E. F.; Kirby, E. J.; and Meyer, J. V.: Lymphodynamics , Plast Reconstr Surg 25:337, 1960.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1963

References