Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Lyme Disease?-Reply

Lyme Disease?-Reply Abstract In Reply. —Dr Winterkorn objects to our association of branch retinal artery occlusion and Lyme disease on two premises: (1) the serologic evidence supports a diagnosis of syphilis and not Lyme disease, and (2) even if our patient had Lyme disease, the artery occlusion was merely a coincidence and not causally related. For the following reasons we believe both objections are unfounded.The serologic diagnosis of Lyme disease is a well-recognized quagmire because of the cross-reactivity of Lyme sera with serologic tests for other spirochetal diseases, including syphilis. Conversely, sera from patients with syphilis can cross-react with the serologic tests for Lyme disease.1,2 Whether or not syphilis is the most common cause of positive Lyme serologic test results in Miami, Fla, is irrelevant since Lyme disease is inarguably a common cause of positive Lyme serologic tests results. Winterkorn asserts without substantiating references that "Lyme disease itself does not produce References 1. Magnarelli LA, Anderson JF, Johnson RC. Cross-reactivity in serologic tests for Lyme disease and other spirochetal infections . J Infect Dis . 1987;156:183-188.Crossref 2. Hunter EF, Russell H, Farshy CE, Sampson JS, Larsen SA. Evaluation of sera from patients with Lyme disease in the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test for syphilis . Sex Transm Dis . 1986;13:232-236.Crossref 3. Duray PH, Steere AC. Clinical pathologic correlations of Lyme disease by stage . Ann N Y Acad Sci . 1988;539:65-79.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/lyme-disease-reply-Hbu20IVkgK
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1992.01080180019003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. —Dr Winterkorn objects to our association of branch retinal artery occlusion and Lyme disease on two premises: (1) the serologic evidence supports a diagnosis of syphilis and not Lyme disease, and (2) even if our patient had Lyme disease, the artery occlusion was merely a coincidence and not causally related. For the following reasons we believe both objections are unfounded.The serologic diagnosis of Lyme disease is a well-recognized quagmire because of the cross-reactivity of Lyme sera with serologic tests for other spirochetal diseases, including syphilis. Conversely, sera from patients with syphilis can cross-react with the serologic tests for Lyme disease.1,2 Whether or not syphilis is the most common cause of positive Lyme serologic test results in Miami, Fla, is irrelevant since Lyme disease is inarguably a common cause of positive Lyme serologic tests results. Winterkorn asserts without substantiating references that "Lyme disease itself does not produce References 1. Magnarelli LA, Anderson JF, Johnson RC. Cross-reactivity in serologic tests for Lyme disease and other spirochetal infections . J Infect Dis . 1987;156:183-188.Crossref 2. Hunter EF, Russell H, Farshy CE, Sampson JS, Larsen SA. Evaluation of sera from patients with Lyme disease in the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test for syphilis . Sex Transm Dis . 1986;13:232-236.Crossref 3. Duray PH, Steere AC. Clinical pathologic correlations of Lyme disease by stage . Ann N Y Acad Sci . 1988;539:65-79.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1992

References