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Lyme Disease?

Lyme Disease? Abstract To the Editor. —Lightman and Brod1 recently described a patient with a branch retinal artery occlusion, which they have attributed to Lyme disease, but they provide inadequate justification. As emphasized in my review of the neurologic and ophthalmic manifestations of Lyme disease,2 which was cited by the authors in their report, many abnormalities attributed to Lyme disease have not had a causal relationship established, and this case seems to be another example of overdiagnosis of Lyme disease.The report describes a 37-year-old woman who developed a branch retinal artery occlusion following a systemic illness. An extensive workup revealed only an elevated Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate, a reactive fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbent test (FTA-ABS), and a Lyme enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the results of which were reported as positive. The patient apparently had syphilis and was treated with intravenous penicillin G, with resolution of her systemic symptoms. Positive FTA-ABS results References 1. Lightman DA, Brod RD. Branch retinal artery occlusion associated with Lyme disease . Arch Ophthalmol . 1991;109:1198-1199.Crossref 2. Winterkorn JMS. Lyme disease: neurologic and ophthalmic manifestations . Surv Ophthalmol . 1990;35:191-204.Crossref 3. Smith JL, Parsons TM, Paris-Hamelin AJ, Porschen RK. The prevalence of Lyme disease in a nonendemic area . J Clin Neuro Ophthalmol . 1989;9:148-155. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Lyme Disease?

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —Lightman and Brod1 recently described a patient with a branch retinal artery occlusion, which they have attributed to Lyme disease, but they provide inadequate justification. As emphasized in my review of the neurologic and ophthalmic manifestations of Lyme disease,2 which was cited by the authors in their report, many abnormalities attributed to Lyme disease have not had a causal relationship established, and this case seems to be another example of...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1992.01080180019002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —Lightman and Brod1 recently described a patient with a branch retinal artery occlusion, which they have attributed to Lyme disease, but they provide inadequate justification. As emphasized in my review of the neurologic and ophthalmic manifestations of Lyme disease,2 which was cited by the authors in their report, many abnormalities attributed to Lyme disease have not had a causal relationship established, and this case seems to be another example of overdiagnosis of Lyme disease.The report describes a 37-year-old woman who developed a branch retinal artery occlusion following a systemic illness. An extensive workup revealed only an elevated Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate, a reactive fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbent test (FTA-ABS), and a Lyme enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the results of which were reported as positive. The patient apparently had syphilis and was treated with intravenous penicillin G, with resolution of her systemic symptoms. Positive FTA-ABS results References 1. Lightman DA, Brod RD. Branch retinal artery occlusion associated with Lyme disease . Arch Ophthalmol . 1991;109:1198-1199.Crossref 2. Winterkorn JMS. Lyme disease: neurologic and ophthalmic manifestations . Surv Ophthalmol . 1990;35:191-204.Crossref 3. Smith JL, Parsons TM, Paris-Hamelin AJ, Porschen RK. The prevalence of Lyme disease in a nonendemic area . J Clin Neuro Ophthalmol . 1989;9:148-155.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1992

References