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Lung Cancer Screening Websites—Balanced Information vs Advertisement

Lung Cancer Screening Websites—Balanced Information vs Advertisement Opinion EDITORIAL Lung Cancer Screening Websites— Balanced Information vs Advertisement Steven Woloshin, MD, MS; William C. Black, MD; Barnett S. Kramer, MD, MPH In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Clark et al report on There is sparse evidence that meaningful shared decision- the quality of lung cancer screening program websites. A total making is happening. Nor is it clear, from small studies, that of 162 lung cancer screening websites presented benefit far shared decision-making makes a difference in screening de- more than they presented harm (98% presented any benefit cisions. It did not in a 2017 study in which consecutive pa- vs 48% presented any harm). tients referred for screening were surveyed before and after a Apparently only 44% actu- face-to-face shared decision-making visit; 95% of patients pro- Related article page 824 ally quantified benefit, in ceeded with screening. But the process seemed to make a dif- most cases doing so using relative risk reductions without the ference in 2019 study of Medicare enrollees in which the cor- base rate (ie, benefit presented as a 20% reduction in lung can- responding proportion of patients proceeding with screening cer mortality without defining “20% of what” or giving the ab- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Lung Cancer Screening Websites—Balanced Information vs Advertisement

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Lung Cancer Screening Websites— Balanced Information vs Advertisement Steven Woloshin, MD, MS; William C. Black, MD; Barnett S. Kramer, MD, MPH In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Clark et al report on There is sparse evidence that meaningful shared decision- the quality of lung cancer screening program websites. A total making is happening. Nor is it clear, from small studies, that of 162 lung cancer screening websites presented benefit far shared decision-making makes a difference in screening de- more than they presented harm (98% presented any benefit cisions. It did not in a 2017 study in which consecutive pa- vs 48% presented any harm). tients referred for screening were surveyed before and after a Apparently only 44% actu- face-to-face shared decision-making visit; 95% of patients pro- Related article page 824 ally quantified benefit, in ceeded with screening. But the process seemed to make a dif- most cases doing so using relative risk reductions without the ference in 2019 study of Medicare enrollees in which the cor- base rate (ie, benefit presented as a 20% reduction in lung can- responding proportion of patients proceeding with screening cer mortality without defining “20% of what” or giving the ab-

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 13, 2020

References