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Loss of Voice as Sole Symptom of Subglottic Foreign-Body Aspiration

Loss of Voice as Sole Symptom of Subglottic Foreign-Body Aspiration Abstract Sir.—We read with interest the article by Gay et al1 on subglottic foreign bodies in pediatric patients. All of their patients had either wheezing or respiratory distress in addition to other clinical features such as stridor, cough, and voice change. We report our experience with a case of a laryngeal foreign body lodged in the laryngeal wall just lateral to the left vocal cord, causing temporary paralysis of the cord. The only clinical signs were hoarseness and stridor. Patient Report.—A 3-year-old male infant was admitted to our pediatric department because of hoarseness. According to his parents, the child, while eating un-shelled sunflower seeds, suddenly became pale, had a cough attack lasting a few seconds, and, immediately thereafter, lost his voice. The physical examination on admission revealed a well-developed child without cyanosis or respiratory distress. The temperature was 37°C. The only physical sign was the hoarseness. No abnormal References 1. Gay BB Jr, Atkinson GO, Vanderzalm T, et al: Subglottic foreign bodies in pediatric patients . AJDC 1986;140:165-168. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Loss of Voice as Sole Symptom of Subglottic Foreign-Body Aspiration

Loss of Voice as Sole Symptom of Subglottic Foreign-Body Aspiration

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—We read with interest the article by Gay et al1 on subglottic foreign bodies in pediatric patients. All of their patients had either wheezing or respiratory distress in addition to other clinical features such as stridor, cough, and voice change. We report our experience with a case of a laryngeal foreign body lodged in the laryngeal wall just lateral to the left vocal cord, causing temporary paralysis of the cord. The only clinical signs were hoarseness and stridor....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140240019012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—We read with interest the article by Gay et al1 on subglottic foreign bodies in pediatric patients. All of their patients had either wheezing or respiratory distress in addition to other clinical features such as stridor, cough, and voice change. We report our experience with a case of a laryngeal foreign body lodged in the laryngeal wall just lateral to the left vocal cord, causing temporary paralysis of the cord. The only clinical signs were hoarseness and stridor. Patient Report.—A 3-year-old male infant was admitted to our pediatric department because of hoarseness. According to his parents, the child, while eating un-shelled sunflower seeds, suddenly became pale, had a cough attack lasting a few seconds, and, immediately thereafter, lost his voice. The physical examination on admission revealed a well-developed child without cyanosis or respiratory distress. The temperature was 37°C. The only physical sign was the hoarseness. No abnormal References 1. Gay BB Jr, Atkinson GO, Vanderzalm T, et al: Subglottic foreign bodies in pediatric patients . AJDC 1986;140:165-168.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1986

References