Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

LOCALIZED GANGRENE FOLLOWING THE HYPODERMIC ADMINISTRATION OF CALCIUM CHLORID

LOCALIZED GANGRENE FOLLOWING THE HYPODERMIC ADMINISTRATION OF CALCIUM CHLORID Symptoms of obstructive jaundice invariably create a serious problem for the surgeon, if an operation is to be performed to relieve either the jaundice or some other intercurrent symptom. The physical resistance of this group of patients is lowered; but this, in itself, does not constitute the major surgical problem. Hemorrhage, frequently not responsive to any type of treatment, and ending in death, is the factor that renders surgical judgment difficult in every instance of obstructive jaundice. In the present state of our knowledge, it is not easy to say with positive assurance what agency is directly responsible for this tendency to bleed. As surgeons we have become accustomed to associate a prolonged clotting time with obstructive jaundice; however, we are not warranted even in taking this seemingly well established position. We would be on safer ground if we regarded every jaundiced patient as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

LOCALIZED GANGRENE FOLLOWING THE HYPODERMIC ADMINISTRATION OF CALCIUM CHLORID

JAMA , Volume 84 (19) – May 9, 1925

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/localized-gangrene-following-the-hypodermic-administration-of-calcium-nd54IX2Zj3
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02660450021012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Symptoms of obstructive jaundice invariably create a serious problem for the surgeon, if an operation is to be performed to relieve either the jaundice or some other intercurrent symptom. The physical resistance of this group of patients is lowered; but this, in itself, does not constitute the major surgical problem. Hemorrhage, frequently not responsive to any type of treatment, and ending in death, is the factor that renders surgical judgment difficult in every instance of obstructive jaundice. In the present state of our knowledge, it is not easy to say with positive assurance what agency is directly responsible for this tendency to bleed. As surgeons we have become accustomed to associate a prolonged clotting time with obstructive jaundice; however, we are not warranted even in taking this seemingly well established position. We would be on safer ground if we regarded every jaundiced patient as

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 9, 1925

There are no references for this article.