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Localized Bullous Keratopathy Secondary to Adherent Lens Capsule

Localized Bullous Keratopathy Secondary to Adherent Lens Capsule This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor. —During the anterior capsulotomy portion of extracapsular cataract extraction, a small piece of anterior capsule may become adherent to corneal endothelium. The capsule fragment acts as a nonpermeable membrane and causes a localized area of bullous keratopathy. On the first postoperative day, the edematous area is sufficiently hazy to prevent identification of the outline of the fragment. During the next several days, the edema subsides and the fragment can be seen adherent to endothelium. The edema remains, and, over the course of several months, an area of bullous keratopathy develops. The patient experiences a foreign body sensation when epithelial bullae are present. Hypertonic sodium chloride may decrease the symptoms; a bandage contact lens may be necessary. If the capsule fragment's adherence and subsequent edema occur over the visual axis, the vision will be diminished, perhaps sufficiently to warrant a penetrating keratoplasty.When this phenomenon was first identified, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Localized Bullous Keratopathy Secondary to Adherent Lens Capsule

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 104 (5) – May 1, 1986

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1986.01050170029008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor. —During the anterior capsulotomy portion of extracapsular cataract extraction, a small piece of anterior capsule may become adherent to corneal endothelium. The capsule fragment acts as a nonpermeable membrane and causes a localized area of bullous keratopathy. On the first postoperative day, the edematous area is sufficiently hazy to prevent identification of the outline of the fragment. During the next several days, the edema subsides and the fragment can be seen adherent to endothelium. The edema remains, and, over the course of several months, an area of bullous keratopathy develops. The patient experiences a foreign body sensation when epithelial bullae are present. Hypertonic sodium chloride may decrease the symptoms; a bandage contact lens may be necessary. If the capsule fragment's adherence and subsequent edema occur over the visual axis, the vision will be diminished, perhaps sufficiently to warrant a penetrating keratoplasty.When this phenomenon was first identified,

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1986

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