Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Literature Reports of Angiotensin Receptor Antagonist–Induced Angioedema in Patients With a History of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor–Induced Angioedema

Literature Reports of Angiotensin Receptor Antagonist–Induced Angioedema in Patients With a... It was with grave concern that I read a recent case report by Drs Gavras and Gavras in the January 27, 2003, issue of the ARCHIVES.1 Their report described no incidents of angioedema following the use of angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) in 10 patients who had previously incurred angioedema secondary to the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.1 Their case report omitted numerous findings from the literature, and as a result the authors' conclusion is dangerously misleading. The authors stated that they were "not aware of any report about patients who developed angioedema while receiving ACE inhibition and who were subsequently treated with an ARB."1 The fact of the matter is that numerous such cases have been reported,2-6 the first in 1996 by Boxer.3 One of these studies reported that from a group of 13 patients known to have angioedema caused by ARB use, 3 had a history of angioedema caused by ACE inhibitor use.5 These reports can all be found through MEDLINE and other literature search engines and should be included in any discussion of ACE inhibitor and ARB-induced angioedema. Angioedema can be life threatening. The fact that some patients with ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema also subsequently developed angioedema from ARB use makes ARB therapy potentially dangerous in any patient with a history of ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema. While it provides hopeful data, unfortunately the report from Drs Gavras and Gavras does not alleviate concerns of using ARBs in patients with a history of ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema. Caution is advised in these situations.2-6 References 1. Gavras IGavras H Are patients who develop angioedema with ACE inhibition at risk of the same problem with AT1 receptor blockers? Arch Intern Med. 2003;163240- 241Google ScholarCrossref 2. Warner KKVisconti JATschampel MM Angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema. Ann Pharmacother. 2000;34526- 528Google ScholarCrossref 3. Boxer M Accupril- and cozaar-induced angioedema in the same patient [letter]. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1996;98471Google ScholarCrossref 4. Sharma PKYium JJ Angioedema associated with angiotensin II receptor antagonist losartan. South Med J. 1997;90552- 553Google ScholarCrossref 5. van Rijnsoever EWKwee-Zuiderwijk WJMFeenstra J Angioneurotic edema attributed to use of losartan. Arch Intern Med. 1998;1582063- 2065Google ScholarCrossref 6. Cha YJPearson VE Angioedema due to losartan. Ann Pharmacother. 1999;33936- 938Google ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Literature Reports of Angiotensin Receptor Antagonist–Induced Angioedema in Patients With a History of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor–Induced Angioedema

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 163 (12) – Jun 23, 2003

Literature Reports of Angiotensin Receptor Antagonist–Induced Angioedema in Patients With a History of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor–Induced Angioedema

Abstract

It was with grave concern that I read a recent case report by Drs Gavras and Gavras in the January 27, 2003, issue of the ARCHIVES.1 Their report described no incidents of angioedema following the use of angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) in 10 patients who had previously incurred angioedema secondary to the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.1 Their case report omitted numerous findings from the literature, and as a result the authors' conclusion is dangerously...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/literature-reports-of-angiotensin-receptor-antagonist-induced-akmNc78J1t
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.163.12.1488-a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It was with grave concern that I read a recent case report by Drs Gavras and Gavras in the January 27, 2003, issue of the ARCHIVES.1 Their report described no incidents of angioedema following the use of angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) in 10 patients who had previously incurred angioedema secondary to the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.1 Their case report omitted numerous findings from the literature, and as a result the authors' conclusion is dangerously misleading. The authors stated that they were "not aware of any report about patients who developed angioedema while receiving ACE inhibition and who were subsequently treated with an ARB."1 The fact of the matter is that numerous such cases have been reported,2-6 the first in 1996 by Boxer.3 One of these studies reported that from a group of 13 patients known to have angioedema caused by ARB use, 3 had a history of angioedema caused by ACE inhibitor use.5 These reports can all be found through MEDLINE and other literature search engines and should be included in any discussion of ACE inhibitor and ARB-induced angioedema. Angioedema can be life threatening. The fact that some patients with ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema also subsequently developed angioedema from ARB use makes ARB therapy potentially dangerous in any patient with a history of ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema. While it provides hopeful data, unfortunately the report from Drs Gavras and Gavras does not alleviate concerns of using ARBs in patients with a history of ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema. Caution is advised in these situations.2-6 References 1. Gavras IGavras H Are patients who develop angioedema with ACE inhibition at risk of the same problem with AT1 receptor blockers? Arch Intern Med. 2003;163240- 241Google ScholarCrossref 2. Warner KKVisconti JATschampel MM Angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema. Ann Pharmacother. 2000;34526- 528Google ScholarCrossref 3. Boxer M Accupril- and cozaar-induced angioedema in the same patient [letter]. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1996;98471Google ScholarCrossref 4. Sharma PKYium JJ Angioedema associated with angiotensin II receptor antagonist losartan. South Med J. 1997;90552- 553Google ScholarCrossref 5. van Rijnsoever EWKwee-Zuiderwijk WJMFeenstra J Angioneurotic edema attributed to use of losartan. Arch Intern Med. 1998;1582063- 2065Google ScholarCrossref 6. Cha YJPearson VE Angioedema due to losartan. Ann Pharmacother. 1999;33936- 938Google ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 23, 2003

Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors,angioedema,angiotensin receptors,antagonists

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month