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Lipid Analysis of the Human Cornea With and Without Arcus Senilis

Lipid Analysis of the Human Cornea With and Without Arcus Senilis Abstract For many years attempts have been made to ascertain the composition of arcus senilis in the cornea. The earliest examinations were qualitative ones and were performed by histological methods between 1850 and the early 1900's.1-7 For several decades subsequently, interest in arcus senilis seemed to wane. During the 1940's and 1950's, however, with the tremendous interest in the relationship of cholesterol to atherosclerosis, interest in arcus senilis was revived because of its possible relationship to cholesterol. Cogan and Kuwabara (1959),8 using histochemical and fat solubility studies, concluded that the arcus was composed primarily of cholesterol, phospholipids, and neutral fats. Andrews (1961),9 using quantitative biochemical analyses, concluded that the lipid associated with arcus senilis consists primarily of sterol ester with small amounts of neutral glycerides, sterol, and phospholipids also being present. An objection to the work of Andrews is that the controls, or corneas with no arcus, were References 1. In cases 3 and 9, only one cornea was available. Therefore, the amount of lipid present in one cornea was multiplied by a factor of two, assuming that this would then represent the total amount of a particular total lipid for two corneas, thus making it easier to compare with the rest of the samples. 2. Canton, E.: Observations on the Arcus Senilis or Fatty Degeneration of the Cornea: II , Lancet 1: 38 3. III, 1:560, 1850. 4. His, W.: Normalen und Patholsgischen Histologic der Cornea , Basel, 1856, pp 137-140. 5. Fuchs, E.: Zur Anatomie der Pinguecula , Graefe Arch Ophthal 37:143-191, 1891.Crossref 6. Leber, T.: Ueber die bandförmige Hornhauttrubüng , Ber Deutsch Ophthal Ges 26:53-64, 1897. 7. Takayasu, M.: Beiträge zur pathologische Anatomie des Arcus Senilis , Arch Augenheilk 43: 154-162, 1901. 8. Parsons, J.H.: Arcus Senilis , R.L.O.H. Rep , 15: 141-154, 1902. 9. Attias, G.: Uber Altersveranderungen des menschlichen Auges , Graefe Arch Ophthal 81:405-485, 1912.Crossref 10. Cogan, D.G., and Kuwabara, T.: Arcus Senilis , Arch Ophthal 68:553-560, 1959.Crossref 11. Andrews, J.S.: The Lipids of Arcus Senilis , Arch Ophthal 68:264-266, 1962.Crossref 12. VanHandel, E., and Zilversmit, D.B.: Micromethod for the Direct Determination of Serum Triglycerides , J Lab Clin Med 50:152-157 ( (July) ) 1957. 13. Bartlett, G.R.: Phosphorus Assay in Column Chromatography , J Biol Chem 234:466-468 ( (March) ) 1959. 14. Sperry, W.M., and Webb, M.: A Revision of the Schoenheimer-Sperry Method for Cholesterol Determination , J Biol Chem 187:97-106, 1950. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Lipid Analysis of the Human Cornea With and Without Arcus Senilis

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 76 (3) – Sep 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1966.03850010405020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract For many years attempts have been made to ascertain the composition of arcus senilis in the cornea. The earliest examinations were qualitative ones and were performed by histological methods between 1850 and the early 1900's.1-7 For several decades subsequently, interest in arcus senilis seemed to wane. During the 1940's and 1950's, however, with the tremendous interest in the relationship of cholesterol to atherosclerosis, interest in arcus senilis was revived because of its possible relationship to cholesterol. Cogan and Kuwabara (1959),8 using histochemical and fat solubility studies, concluded that the arcus was composed primarily of cholesterol, phospholipids, and neutral fats. Andrews (1961),9 using quantitative biochemical analyses, concluded that the lipid associated with arcus senilis consists primarily of sterol ester with small amounts of neutral glycerides, sterol, and phospholipids also being present. An objection to the work of Andrews is that the controls, or corneas with no arcus, were References 1. In cases 3 and 9, only one cornea was available. Therefore, the amount of lipid present in one cornea was multiplied by a factor of two, assuming that this would then represent the total amount of a particular total lipid for two corneas, thus making it easier to compare with the rest of the samples. 2. Canton, E.: Observations on the Arcus Senilis or Fatty Degeneration of the Cornea: II , Lancet 1: 38 3. III, 1:560, 1850. 4. His, W.: Normalen und Patholsgischen Histologic der Cornea , Basel, 1856, pp 137-140. 5. Fuchs, E.: Zur Anatomie der Pinguecula , Graefe Arch Ophthal 37:143-191, 1891.Crossref 6. Leber, T.: Ueber die bandförmige Hornhauttrubüng , Ber Deutsch Ophthal Ges 26:53-64, 1897. 7. Takayasu, M.: Beiträge zur pathologische Anatomie des Arcus Senilis , Arch Augenheilk 43: 154-162, 1901. 8. Parsons, J.H.: Arcus Senilis , R.L.O.H. Rep , 15: 141-154, 1902. 9. Attias, G.: Uber Altersveranderungen des menschlichen Auges , Graefe Arch Ophthal 81:405-485, 1912.Crossref 10. Cogan, D.G., and Kuwabara, T.: Arcus Senilis , Arch Ophthal 68:553-560, 1959.Crossref 11. Andrews, J.S.: The Lipids of Arcus Senilis , Arch Ophthal 68:264-266, 1962.Crossref 12. VanHandel, E., and Zilversmit, D.B.: Micromethod for the Direct Determination of Serum Triglycerides , J Lab Clin Med 50:152-157 ( (July) ) 1957. 13. Bartlett, G.R.: Phosphorus Assay in Column Chromatography , J Biol Chem 234:466-468 ( (March) ) 1959. 14. Sperry, W.M., and Webb, M.: A Revision of the Schoenheimer-Sperry Method for Cholesterol Determination , J Biol Chem 187:97-106, 1950.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1966

References

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