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LIGATION OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY IN CONJUNCTION WITH EXSECTION OF JAWS, AND THE INOPERABLE DISEASES OF THE SAME.

LIGATION OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY IN CONJUNCTION WITH EXSECTION OF JAWS, AND THE INOPERABLE... A survey of the literature of surgery will demonstrate the fact, that of all the great vessels that we have dealt with, the external carotid has been less frequently subjected to ligation than any other, if we except its companion the internal. This has largely due to the fact, that prior to the advent of the present era of surgery, the anatomic distribution of the branches of this vessel acted as a bar to its closure, on account of the danger of secondary hemorrhage at the time of the separation of the ligature. Since the advent of the antiseptic practice, which has rendered it safe to leave a ligature in situ without fear, this has ceased to be an objection, and this vessel has become one of those most accessible, and whose ligation is practically free from subsequent danger. When we consider its territory of distribution, and the structures supplied http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

LIGATION OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY IN CONJUNCTION WITH EXSECTION OF JAWS, AND THE INOPERABLE DISEASES OF THE SAME.

JAMA , Volume XXVI (23) – Jun 6, 1896

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1896 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1896.02430750005001b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A survey of the literature of surgery will demonstrate the fact, that of all the great vessels that we have dealt with, the external carotid has been less frequently subjected to ligation than any other, if we except its companion the internal. This has largely due to the fact, that prior to the advent of the present era of surgery, the anatomic distribution of the branches of this vessel acted as a bar to its closure, on account of the danger of secondary hemorrhage at the time of the separation of the ligature. Since the advent of the antiseptic practice, which has rendered it safe to leave a ligature in situ without fear, this has ceased to be an objection, and this vessel has become one of those most accessible, and whose ligation is practically free from subsequent danger. When we consider its territory of distribution, and the structures supplied

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 6, 1896

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