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Life Before MEDLINE: Myasthenia Gravis, Muscular Dystrophy, and Myasthenic Myopathy-Reply

Life Before MEDLINE: Myasthenia Gravis, Muscular Dystrophy, and Myasthenic Myopathy-Reply Abstract In Reply. —Dr Rowland has brought to our attention the articles of Johns et al1 and McQuillen,2 which represent problems similar to those seen in our patient. In addition, he voices his concern about terminology. The cases cited by Dr Rowland are, however, different from our patient in a number of ways; most of the patients had ocular or bulbar signs early and/or episodic disease.3-5 In addition, some had conditions that we now recognize as congenital myopathy6 or inflammatory myopathy.7The patients described by McQuillen represent an interesting family with early onset of proximal weakness and a minimal response to anticholinesterase drugs. Should any neuromuscular disease that responds to cholinesterase drugs be called myasthenia gravis? Many neuromuscular diseases with weakness, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respond in some degree to anticholinesterase drugs. At the present time, that does not mean that these patients have myasthenia gravis. In time References 1. Johns TR, Campa JF, Crowley WJ, Miller JQ. Familial myasthenic myopathy . Neurology . 1971;21:449. 2. McQuillen MP. Familial limb-girdle myasthenia . Brain . 1966;89:121-132.Crossref 3. Rowland LP, Eskenazi AN. Myasthenia gravis with features resembling muscular dystrophy . Neurology . 1956;6:667-671.Crossref 4. Garcin R, Fardeau M, Godet-Guillain M. A clinical and pathological study of a case of alternating and recurrent external ophthalmoplegia with amyotrophy of the limbs observed for fortyfive years: discussion of the relationship of the condition with myasthenia gravis . Brain . 1945;88:739-752.Crossref 5. Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz I, Falkiewiczowa S, Jedrzejewska H, Kamieniecka Z, Fidianska A. Descending dystrophy or advanced myasthenia . Schweiz Arch Neurol Neurochir Psychiatr . 1965;95:233-245. 6. Walton JN, Geschwind N, Simpson JH. Benign congenital myopathy with myasthenic features . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry . 1956;19:224-231.Crossref 7. Namba T, Brunner NG, Grob D. Idiopathic giant cell polymyositis: report of a case and review of the syndrome . Arch Neurol . 1974;31:27-30.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Life Before MEDLINE: Myasthenia Gravis, Muscular Dystrophy, and Myasthenic Myopathy-Reply

Life Before MEDLINE: Myasthenia Gravis, Muscular Dystrophy, and Myasthenic Myopathy-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. —Dr Rowland has brought to our attention the articles of Johns et al1 and McQuillen,2 which represent problems similar to those seen in our patient. In addition, he voices his concern about terminology. The cases cited by Dr Rowland are, however, different from our patient in a number of ways; most of the patients had ocular or bulbar signs early and/or episodic disease.3-5 In addition, some had conditions that we now recognize as congenital myopathy6 or inflammatory...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1989.00520460022007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. —Dr Rowland has brought to our attention the articles of Johns et al1 and McQuillen,2 which represent problems similar to those seen in our patient. In addition, he voices his concern about terminology. The cases cited by Dr Rowland are, however, different from our patient in a number of ways; most of the patients had ocular or bulbar signs early and/or episodic disease.3-5 In addition, some had conditions that we now recognize as congenital myopathy6 or inflammatory myopathy.7The patients described by McQuillen represent an interesting family with early onset of proximal weakness and a minimal response to anticholinesterase drugs. Should any neuromuscular disease that responds to cholinesterase drugs be called myasthenia gravis? Many neuromuscular diseases with weakness, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respond in some degree to anticholinesterase drugs. At the present time, that does not mean that these patients have myasthenia gravis. In time References 1. Johns TR, Campa JF, Crowley WJ, Miller JQ. Familial myasthenic myopathy . Neurology . 1971;21:449. 2. McQuillen MP. Familial limb-girdle myasthenia . Brain . 1966;89:121-132.Crossref 3. Rowland LP, Eskenazi AN. Myasthenia gravis with features resembling muscular dystrophy . Neurology . 1956;6:667-671.Crossref 4. Garcin R, Fardeau M, Godet-Guillain M. A clinical and pathological study of a case of alternating and recurrent external ophthalmoplegia with amyotrophy of the limbs observed for fortyfive years: discussion of the relationship of the condition with myasthenia gravis . Brain . 1945;88:739-752.Crossref 5. Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz I, Falkiewiczowa S, Jedrzejewska H, Kamieniecka Z, Fidianska A. Descending dystrophy or advanced myasthenia . Schweiz Arch Neurol Neurochir Psychiatr . 1965;95:233-245. 6. Walton JN, Geschwind N, Simpson JH. Benign congenital myopathy with myasthenic features . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry . 1956;19:224-231.Crossref 7. Namba T, Brunner NG, Grob D. Idiopathic giant cell polymyositis: report of a case and review of the syndrome . Arch Neurol . 1974;31:27-30.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1989

References