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LEUKEMIA.

LEUKEMIA. In The Journal, March 26, 1904, we gave a preliminary report of a case of splenomedullary leukemia symptomatically cured by the Roentgen rays. Since then we have given a more detailed account of the same case,1 and now as it has come to autopsy we make a final report. Especial attention will be given to the postmortem findings, in the hope that some light may be thrown on the modus operandi and the value of the x-rays in this class of cases. No attempt will be made to review the literature, as this has been done so completely by Dr. George Dock2 quite recently. We repeat the history of the case, as given in the other reports, together with the later developments: Patient. —W. E., male, American, aged 30, a cigar maker, unmarried, was first examined July 1, 1903. His family history is negative, except that one sister has had tuberculosis. History. —The patient has lived in Decatur all his life; his habits have been good; he does not use alcohol, but he is a moderate smoker. He has had the usual diseases of childhood, with good recovery in all. No history of malaria or syphilis. Present Trouble. —The patient came to the office complaining of weakness, pain in the back and a feeling of weight and distress in the left side. Two years ago he had a fall, alighting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.92500390037003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In The Journal, March 26, 1904, we gave a preliminary report of a case of splenomedullary leukemia symptomatically cured by the Roentgen rays. Since then we have given a more detailed account of the same case,1 and now as it has come to autopsy we make a final report. Especial attention will be given to the postmortem findings, in the hope that some light may be thrown on the modus operandi and the value of the x-rays in this class of cases. No attempt will be made to review the literature, as this has been done so completely by Dr. George Dock2 quite recently. We repeat the history of the case, as given in the other reports, together with the later developments: Patient. —W. E., male, American, aged 30, a cigar maker, unmarried, was first examined July 1, 1903. His family history is negative, except that one sister has had tuberculosis. History. —The patient has lived in Decatur all his life; his habits have been good; he does not use alcohol, but he is a moderate smoker. He has had the usual diseases of childhood, with good recovery in all. No history of malaria or syphilis. Present Trouble. —The patient came to the office complaining of weakness, pain in the back and a feeling of weight and distress in the left side. Two years ago he had a fall, alighting

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 25, 1905

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