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Let's Not Overmedicalize-Reply

Let's Not Overmedicalize-Reply Abstract In Reply. — The great majority of "minor illness symptoms" are transient and prove to be inconsequential. The problem, of course, for both the patient and the doctor, is knowing where to draw the line. When are dizziness, headache, fatigue, and a sore throat just "minor vicissitudes," and not Meniere's disease, a brain tumor, hypothyroidism, or a prelude to preventable rheumatic heart disease? Should chest pain and abdominal pain ever be treated as "minor vicissitudes," even though they usually are? Each of us has our own styles in trying to seprarate the wheat from the chaff, but do we know how much overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis we are guilty of? Do we even have the data that would allow us to answer that question?Then, too, as highlighted by Kroenke et al,1 some minor illness symptoms, whatever their basis, are not transient. They are chronic, recurring symptoms that impair a patient's function, sometimes References 1. Kroenke K, Wood DR, Mangelsdorff AD, Meier NJ, Powell JB. Chronic fatigue in primary care: prevalence, patient characteristics, and outcome . JAMA. 1988;260:929-934.Crossref 2. Wells KB, Hays RD, Burnam MA, Rogers W, Greenfield S, Ware JE. Detection of depressive disorder for patients receiving prepaid or fee-for-service care: results from the Medical Outcomes Study . JAMA. 1989;262:3298-3302.Crossref 3. Kroenke K, Mangelsdorff AD. Common symptoms in ambulatory care: incidence, evaluation, therapy and outcome . Am J Med. 1989;86:262-266.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Let's Not Overmedicalize-Reply

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 151 (6) – Jun 1, 1991

Let's Not Overmedicalize-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. — The great majority of "minor illness symptoms" are transient and prove to be inconsequential. The problem, of course, for both the patient and the doctor, is knowing where to draw the line. When are dizziness, headache, fatigue, and a sore throat just "minor vicissitudes," and not Meniere's disease, a brain tumor, hypothyroidism, or a prelude to preventable rheumatic heart disease? Should chest pain and abdominal pain ever be treated as...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400060144038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. — The great majority of "minor illness symptoms" are transient and prove to be inconsequential. The problem, of course, for both the patient and the doctor, is knowing where to draw the line. When are dizziness, headache, fatigue, and a sore throat just "minor vicissitudes," and not Meniere's disease, a brain tumor, hypothyroidism, or a prelude to preventable rheumatic heart disease? Should chest pain and abdominal pain ever be treated as "minor vicissitudes," even though they usually are? Each of us has our own styles in trying to seprarate the wheat from the chaff, but do we know how much overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis we are guilty of? Do we even have the data that would allow us to answer that question?Then, too, as highlighted by Kroenke et al,1 some minor illness symptoms, whatever their basis, are not transient. They are chronic, recurring symptoms that impair a patient's function, sometimes References 1. Kroenke K, Wood DR, Mangelsdorff AD, Meier NJ, Powell JB. Chronic fatigue in primary care: prevalence, patient characteristics, and outcome . JAMA. 1988;260:929-934.Crossref 2. Wells KB, Hays RD, Burnam MA, Rogers W, Greenfield S, Ware JE. Detection of depressive disorder for patients receiving prepaid or fee-for-service care: results from the Medical Outcomes Study . JAMA. 1989;262:3298-3302.Crossref 3. Kroenke K, Mangelsdorff AD. Common symptoms in ambulatory care: incidence, evaluation, therapy and outcome . Am J Med. 1989;86:262-266.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1991

References