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Less Radiation but More Overall Advanced Imaging in Children—Good News or Bad News?

Less Radiation but More Overall Advanced Imaging in Children—Good News or Bad News? Opinion EDITORIAL Less Radiation but More Overall Advanced Imaging in Children— Good News or Bad News? Alan R. Schroeder, MD; Daniel L. Imler, MD During the past 2 decades, excessive diagnostic imaging has CT scans were avoided in the most recent year compared with been a common target for high-value care efforts. Given con- 2009. Estimates for the number of CT scans needed to cause 1 cancer are challenging to calculate and vary widely across cerns about ionizing radiation and the risk of subsequent can- cers, numerous initiatives have aimed to reduce unnecessary studies. Using findings from 1 study in which the number computed tomography (CT), mostly ranged from 300 to 1000 (depending on age, sex, and particularly in children. Ad- imaging type), this decrease may have translated into preven- Related article vocacy campaigns, such as tion of 25 to 50 cancers or more across the 32 hospitals in 2018. Image Gently, Image Wisely, and Choosing Wisely, have high- Magnified across the US, this number would be considerably lighted the downstream risks associated with radiation and greater. This is good news. We are capable of changing prac- have encouraged eliminating unnecessary studies while re- tice, thereby protecting some children http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Less Radiation but More Overall Advanced Imaging in Children—Good News or Bad News?

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 174 (9) – Sep 3, 2020

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.2222
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Less Radiation but More Overall Advanced Imaging in Children— Good News or Bad News? Alan R. Schroeder, MD; Daniel L. Imler, MD During the past 2 decades, excessive diagnostic imaging has CT scans were avoided in the most recent year compared with been a common target for high-value care efforts. Given con- 2009. Estimates for the number of CT scans needed to cause 1 cancer are challenging to calculate and vary widely across cerns about ionizing radiation and the risk of subsequent can- cers, numerous initiatives have aimed to reduce unnecessary studies. Using findings from 1 study in which the number computed tomography (CT), mostly ranged from 300 to 1000 (depending on age, sex, and particularly in children. Ad- imaging type), this decrease may have translated into preven- Related article vocacy campaigns, such as tion of 25 to 50 cancers or more across the 32 hospitals in 2018. Image Gently, Image Wisely, and Choosing Wisely, have high- Magnified across the US, this number would be considerably lighted the downstream risks associated with radiation and greater. This is good news. We are capable of changing prac- have encouraged eliminating unnecessary studies while re- tice, thereby protecting some children

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 3, 2020

References