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Lentil Aspiration Pneumonia

Lentil Aspiration Pneumonia To the Editor.—Report of a Case.— A 14-year-old boy housed at a special educational school had had cerebral palsy since birth and psychosis that deepened with adolescence. This patient was admitted with respiratory distress, fever, and cough, as well as anemia. On admission, a chest roentgenogram (Fig 1) was taken. After aggressive antibiotic therapy, the radiographic abnormalities were still present. To establish a definitive diagnosis, the patient underwent open-lung biopsy. Postsurgically, he suffered an acute bout of respiratory distress with cardiac arrest and died four weeks after admission. On the admission chest roentgenogram there was a bright, fine interstitial nodular pattern, diffusely distributed over the pulmonary parenchyma with miliary characteristics (Fig 1). The open-lung biopsy disclosed a chronic granulomatous pneumonia secondary to aspiration of food, primary legumen pulse. A postmortem examination revealed a confluent nodular pneumonia in both lungs, pathologically characteristic of lentil aspiration pneumonia. Comment.— Lentil pneumonia is a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Lentil Aspiration Pneumonia

JAMA , Volume 251 (10) – Mar 9, 1984

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1984.03340340019010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor.—Report of a Case.— A 14-year-old boy housed at a special educational school had had cerebral palsy since birth and psychosis that deepened with adolescence. This patient was admitted with respiratory distress, fever, and cough, as well as anemia. On admission, a chest roentgenogram (Fig 1) was taken. After aggressive antibiotic therapy, the radiographic abnormalities were still present. To establish a definitive diagnosis, the patient underwent open-lung biopsy. Postsurgically, he suffered an acute bout of respiratory distress with cardiac arrest and died four weeks after admission. On the admission chest roentgenogram there was a bright, fine interstitial nodular pattern, diffusely distributed over the pulmonary parenchyma with miliary characteristics (Fig 1). The open-lung biopsy disclosed a chronic granulomatous pneumonia secondary to aspiration of food, primary legumen pulse. A postmortem examination revealed a confluent nodular pneumonia in both lungs, pathologically characteristic of lentil aspiration pneumonia. Comment.— Lentil pneumonia is a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 9, 1984

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