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Lens Symposium at Oxford

Lens Symposium at Oxford This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Oxford, England, the traditional site of diverse intellectual controversies, has most recently been the site of an international symposium on biochemistry of the lens. For four days, approximately 30 investigators from various European countries and the United States reported their studies in a thoroughly informal atmosphere. The idea for the symposium and the labors of its organization depended on those two remarkable women, Antoinette Pirie and Ruth van Heyningen, whose book is the standard compendium of ophthalmic biochemistry in the English language. The symposium was generously supported by the Wellcome Trust Fund. The lens is an exciting tissue for those who consider it more than a bag of proteins and water. Enclosed early in embryonic life, it nevertheless carries on an active and continuous metabolism that is adapted to its unique anatomic structure and environment. One of the dominant questions of the conference was whether or not its glucose, ion, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Lens Symposium at Oxford

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 68 (3) – Sep 1, 1962

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1962 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1962.00960030306002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Oxford, England, the traditional site of diverse intellectual controversies, has most recently been the site of an international symposium on biochemistry of the lens. For four days, approximately 30 investigators from various European countries and the United States reported their studies in a thoroughly informal atmosphere. The idea for the symposium and the labors of its organization depended on those two remarkable women, Antoinette Pirie and Ruth van Heyningen, whose book is the standard compendium of ophthalmic biochemistry in the English language. The symposium was generously supported by the Wellcome Trust Fund. The lens is an exciting tissue for those who consider it more than a bag of proteins and water. Enclosed early in embryonic life, it nevertheless carries on an active and continuous metabolism that is adapted to its unique anatomic structure and environment. One of the dominant questions of the conference was whether or not its glucose, ion,

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1962

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