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Legal and Ethical Myths About Informed Consent

Legal and Ethical Myths About Informed Consent Abstract Informed consent is a foundational concept of medical ethics. Since its enunciation almost 4 decades ago, it has engendered, and continues to engender, a great deal of debate and opposition from practicing physicians. We believe that much of the negative reaction to informed consent stems from some fundamental misunderstandings about what informed consent requires. This article discusses and refutes several myths about informed consent that have acquired some currency among physicians. Arch Intern Med. 1996;156:2521-2526 References 1. Faden RR, Beauchamp TL. A History and Theory of Informed Consent . New York, NY: Oxford University Press Inc; 1986. 2. Appelbaum PS, Lidz CW, Meisel A. Informed Consent: Legal Theory and Clinical Practice.New York, NY: Oxford University Press Inc; 1987. 3. Meisel A. The legal consensus about forgoing life-sustaining treatment: its status and its prospects . Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 1992;2:309-345.Crossref 4. Pratt v Davis, 79 NE 562 (III 1906). 5. Katz J. Judges, physicians, and patients . In: The Silent World of Physician and Patient. New York, NY: The Free Press; 1984. 6. Katz RL. Informed consent: is it bad medicine? West J Med. 1977;126:426-428. 7. Burnham PJ. Medical experimentation on humans . Science. 1966;152:448-450.Crossref 8. Veatch RM. Abandoning informed consent . Hastings Cent Rep. 1995;25:5-12.Crossref 9. Lidz CW, Appelbaum PS, Meisel A. Two models of implementing informed consent . Arch Intern Med. 1988;148:1385-1389.Crossref 10. Brody H. Transparency: informed consent in primary care . Hastings Cent Rep. 1989;19:5-9.Crossref 11. Kuczewski MG. Reconceiving the family: the process of consent in medical decision making. Hastings Cent Rep. 1995;26:30-37. 12. Churchill LR. Trust, autonomy, and advance directives . J Religion Health. 1989;28:175-183.Crossref 13. Ferrara v Galluchio, 152 NE 2d 249 (NY 1958). 14. Truman v Thomas, 611 P2d 902 (Cal 1980). 15. Drane JF. Competency to give informed consent . JAMA. 1984;252:925-927.Crossref 16. Buchanan AE, Brock DW. Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decision Making . New York, NY: Cambridge University Press; 1989:17-53. 17. Meisel A. The `exceptions' to the informed consent doctrine: striking a balance between competing values in medical decision-making . Wis Law Rev. 1979:413-88. 18. Nishi v Hartwell, 473 P2d 116 (Haw 1970). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Legal and Ethical Myths About Informed Consent

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 156 (22) – Dec 9, 1996

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1996.00440210023002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Informed consent is a foundational concept of medical ethics. Since its enunciation almost 4 decades ago, it has engendered, and continues to engender, a great deal of debate and opposition from practicing physicians. We believe that much of the negative reaction to informed consent stems from some fundamental misunderstandings about what informed consent requires. This article discusses and refutes several myths about informed consent that have acquired some currency among physicians. Arch Intern Med. 1996;156:2521-2526 References 1. Faden RR, Beauchamp TL. A History and Theory of Informed Consent . New York, NY: Oxford University Press Inc; 1986. 2. Appelbaum PS, Lidz CW, Meisel A. Informed Consent: Legal Theory and Clinical Practice.New York, NY: Oxford University Press Inc; 1987. 3. Meisel A. The legal consensus about forgoing life-sustaining treatment: its status and its prospects . Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 1992;2:309-345.Crossref 4. Pratt v Davis, 79 NE 562 (III 1906). 5. Katz J. Judges, physicians, and patients . In: The Silent World of Physician and Patient. New York, NY: The Free Press; 1984. 6. Katz RL. Informed consent: is it bad medicine? West J Med. 1977;126:426-428. 7. Burnham PJ. Medical experimentation on humans . Science. 1966;152:448-450.Crossref 8. Veatch RM. Abandoning informed consent . Hastings Cent Rep. 1995;25:5-12.Crossref 9. Lidz CW, Appelbaum PS, Meisel A. Two models of implementing informed consent . Arch Intern Med. 1988;148:1385-1389.Crossref 10. Brody H. Transparency: informed consent in primary care . Hastings Cent Rep. 1989;19:5-9.Crossref 11. Kuczewski MG. Reconceiving the family: the process of consent in medical decision making. Hastings Cent Rep. 1995;26:30-37. 12. Churchill LR. Trust, autonomy, and advance directives . J Religion Health. 1989;28:175-183.Crossref 13. Ferrara v Galluchio, 152 NE 2d 249 (NY 1958). 14. Truman v Thomas, 611 P2d 902 (Cal 1980). 15. Drane JF. Competency to give informed consent . JAMA. 1984;252:925-927.Crossref 16. Buchanan AE, Brock DW. Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decision Making . New York, NY: Cambridge University Press; 1989:17-53. 17. Meisel A. The `exceptions' to the informed consent doctrine: striking a balance between competing values in medical decision-making . Wis Law Rev. 1979:413-88. 18. Nishi v Hartwell, 473 P2d 116 (Haw 1970).

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 9, 1996

References