Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Learning Disabilities—The New Problem

Learning Disabilities—The New Problem Abstract Ophthalmologists are often the first referral source for the school child with a reading problem. The referring teacher or school nurse correctly assumes that an examination for eye disease should be one of the first things considered when a child is having trouble with the near tasks of vision; eg, reading. Occasionally, an ocular problem is discovered: hyperopia, iritis, congenital cataract, or hereditary macular disease. But most often, the results of complete visual analysis are normal. The next referral sources can include the child's pediatrician. Because learning disability is a heterogeneous group and various degrees of brain dysfunction may be demonstrated, both a neurological examination and an encephalogram may be necessary.1 A psychological-educational evaluation may be done, and conferences with the school personnel usually determine the choice of treatment for the child. In some areas, a new problem has confronted the educator of school children, that of visual-perception training References 1. Johnson DJ, Myklebust HR: Learning Disabilities . New York, Grune & Stratton Inc, 1967. 2. Carlson PV, Greenspoon MK: The uses and abuses of visual training for children with perceptual-motor learning problems . Amer J Optom 43:161-169, 1968.Crossref 3. Marsland RL, Cratty BJ; The nature of the reading process, the rationale of non-educational remedial methods , in EO Calkins (ed): Reading Forum, monograph II . Bethesda, Md, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, 1969, p 159. 4. Swartwout JB: Educational visual training programs . Academic Ther 7:85-92, 1971. 5. The Eye and Learning Disabilities, Ad Hoc Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, and the American Association of Ophthalmology. Washington, DC, American Association of Ophthalmology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Learning Disabilities—The New Problem

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 88 (3) – Sep 1, 1972

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/learning-disabilities-the-new-problem-UdoiHv505R
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1972.01000030241001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Ophthalmologists are often the first referral source for the school child with a reading problem. The referring teacher or school nurse correctly assumes that an examination for eye disease should be one of the first things considered when a child is having trouble with the near tasks of vision; eg, reading. Occasionally, an ocular problem is discovered: hyperopia, iritis, congenital cataract, or hereditary macular disease. But most often, the results of complete visual analysis are normal. The next referral sources can include the child's pediatrician. Because learning disability is a heterogeneous group and various degrees of brain dysfunction may be demonstrated, both a neurological examination and an encephalogram may be necessary.1 A psychological-educational evaluation may be done, and conferences with the school personnel usually determine the choice of treatment for the child. In some areas, a new problem has confronted the educator of school children, that of visual-perception training References 1. Johnson DJ, Myklebust HR: Learning Disabilities . New York, Grune & Stratton Inc, 1967. 2. Carlson PV, Greenspoon MK: The uses and abuses of visual training for children with perceptual-motor learning problems . Amer J Optom 43:161-169, 1968.Crossref 3. Marsland RL, Cratty BJ; The nature of the reading process, the rationale of non-educational remedial methods , in EO Calkins (ed): Reading Forum, monograph II . Bethesda, Md, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, 1969, p 159. 4. Swartwout JB: Educational visual training programs . Academic Ther 7:85-92, 1971. 5. The Eye and Learning Disabilities, Ad Hoc Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, and the American Association of Ophthalmology. Washington, DC, American Association of Ophthalmology.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1972

References