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Leadership Hunger in a Therapy Group

Leadership Hunger in a Therapy Group Abstract Introduction The power of emotion which a group may display toward its leader frequently comes as a surprise. In many instances it is hard to give a reasonable explanation for such feeling. It can exceed in depth the emotions that might be accounted for on the basis of preference for the personality of the leader. Nor can it be supposed in every instance that the leader’s usefulness in organizing and directing group affairs is responsible for his surpassing importance. What appears to be the cause of the group’s attachment to its leader is a primary need of urgent and vital significance. It appears that this need is more fundamental than any purely rational or practical justification for it.In clinical practice the nature of emotional tendencies often is not brought to light until they are subject to deprivation. Only under conditions of deprivation may the power of the need and the extent of its influence become apparent. If a group References 1. On that occasion, when the observer took over for the therapist, she found herself eagerly accepted by the group in her new role, and the group tolerated the therpist’s absence comparatively easily. Sample comments by the patients were as follows: “Because you have been here with us since the group began, I didn’t think very much today about Dr. Berne’s being gone.” “I thought it would not be so interesting without him, but this discussion has been as interesting as the others.” “I felt today that I could let my hair down.” “Who knows, we may get to be so free in talking with one another we might really let go at one another?” 2. Bion, W. R.: Experiences in Groups: I , Human Relations 1:314 ( (Aug.) ) 1948.Crossref 3. Freud, S.: Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego , New York, Liveright Publishing Corporation, 1951, p. 80. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0375-8532
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1960.03590070077008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Introduction The power of emotion which a group may display toward its leader frequently comes as a surprise. In many instances it is hard to give a reasonable explanation for such feeling. It can exceed in depth the emotions that might be accounted for on the basis of preference for the personality of the leader. Nor can it be supposed in every instance that the leader’s usefulness in organizing and directing group affairs is responsible for his surpassing importance. What appears to be the cause of the group’s attachment to its leader is a primary need of urgent and vital significance. It appears that this need is more fundamental than any purely rational or practical justification for it.In clinical practice the nature of emotional tendencies often is not brought to light until they are subject to deprivation. Only under conditions of deprivation may the power of the need and the extent of its influence become apparent. If a group References 1. On that occasion, when the observer took over for the therapist, she found herself eagerly accepted by the group in her new role, and the group tolerated the therpist’s absence comparatively easily. Sample comments by the patients were as follows: “Because you have been here with us since the group began, I didn’t think very much today about Dr. Berne’s being gone.” “I thought it would not be so interesting without him, but this discussion has been as interesting as the others.” “I felt today that I could let my hair down.” “Who knows, we may get to be so free in talking with one another we might really let go at one another?” 2. Bion, W. R.: Experiences in Groups: I , Human Relations 1:314 ( (Aug.) ) 1948.Crossref 3. Freud, S.: Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego , New York, Liveright Publishing Corporation, 1951, p. 80.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1960

References