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LAY "MEDICAL SCIENCE AT FAULT."

LAY "MEDICAL SCIENCE AT FAULT." One Richard Weightman, posing as a Washington correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, and probably of other newspapers, in times past and present has afforded much joy to medical readers of that paper by certain ponderous deliverances on things medical. Mr. Weightman is intensely antimedical, but he has no idea how funny he is at times. In the Tribune of October 4 he says: "The case of Captain... is a curious illustration of the rudeness with which destiny too often treats the best-laid horoscopes of medical science." He then relates that a naval medical board told "the captain" that he had Bright's disease, and how, after treatment and the lapse of four years, he finally passed the physical examination. "Now he 'ups and dies' of apoplexy without a word of warning from the oracles of science. Amazing are the manifestations of sapience in the various learned professions." What odd pranks does http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

LAY "MEDICAL SCIENCE AT FAULT."

JAMA , Volume XLV (16) – Oct 14, 1905

LAY "MEDICAL SCIENCE AT FAULT."

Abstract


One Richard Weightman, posing as a Washington correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, and probably of other newspapers, in times past and present has afforded much joy to medical readers of that paper by certain ponderous deliverances on things medical. Mr. Weightman is intensely antimedical, but he has no idea how funny he is at times. In the Tribune of October 4 he says: "The case of Captain... is a curious illustration of the rudeness with which destiny too often treats the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02510160046013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One Richard Weightman, posing as a Washington correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, and probably of other newspapers, in times past and present has afforded much joy to medical readers of that paper by certain ponderous deliverances on things medical. Mr. Weightman is intensely antimedical, but he has no idea how funny he is at times. In the Tribune of October 4 he says: "The case of Captain... is a curious illustration of the rudeness with which destiny too often treats the best-laid horoscopes of medical science." He then relates that a naval medical board told "the captain" that he had Bright's disease, and how, after treatment and the lapse of four years, he finally passed the physical examination. "Now he 'ups and dies' of apoplexy without a word of warning from the oracles of science. Amazing are the manifestations of sapience in the various learned professions." What odd pranks does

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 14, 1905

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