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Language Development Among Survivors of Premature Birth

Language Development Among Survivors of Premature Birth Abstract The development of language constitutes a major achievement and landmark in the general development of the young child.1 Since language depends upon the structural, psychomotor as well as the intellectual and emotional integrity of the organism, the study of language development can serve as an additional differential diagnostic and prognostic tool in determining areas of dysfunction which may not otherwise be discernible at an early age. Investigation into the causes of delayed or inadequate communication in the young child facilitates diagnosis since compensatory mechanisms and emotional overlays have often not yet developed. It also ensures habilitative measures at a time when they are most effective, that is, between 3 and 4 years of age. During this time, when language development is most directly dependent on sense perception, absent or defective functions of perception—body image, spatial orientation, and figure ground discrimination leading to symbol behavior-may be developed by training. This References 1. Gesell, A., and Ilg, F. L.: Child Development , New York, Harper & Brothers, 1949, pp. 141-144; 160-161. 2. Kastein, S., and Fowler, E. P., Jr.: Differential Diagnosis of Communication Disorders in Children Referred for Hearing Tests , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 60:468-477 ( (Oct.) ) 1954.Crossref 3. Silverman, W. A.; Andersen, D. H.; Blanc, W. A.; and Crozier, D. N.: A Difference in Mortality Rate and Incidence of Kernicterus Among Premature Infants Alotted to 2 Prophylactic Antibacterial Regimens , Pediatrics 18:614-625 ( (Oct.) ) 1956. 4. Silverman, W. A.: Fate, at Age 2 Years, of Premature Infants Treated with Penicillin/Sulfisoxazole and Oxytetracycline During the First 5 Days of Life, to be published. 5. Strauss, A. A., and Lehtinen, L. E.: Psychopathology and Education of the Brain-Injured Child , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1947, pp. 106-117. 6. Strauss, A. A.; Kephart, N. C.; Lehtinen, L. E., and Goldenberg, S.: Psychopathology and Education of the Brain-Injured Child , Vol. II, New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., New York, 1955, pp. 67-75. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Language Development Among Survivors of Premature Birth

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1959.00730030137001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The development of language constitutes a major achievement and landmark in the general development of the young child.1 Since language depends upon the structural, psychomotor as well as the intellectual and emotional integrity of the organism, the study of language development can serve as an additional differential diagnostic and prognostic tool in determining areas of dysfunction which may not otherwise be discernible at an early age. Investigation into the causes of delayed or inadequate communication in the young child facilitates diagnosis since compensatory mechanisms and emotional overlays have often not yet developed. It also ensures habilitative measures at a time when they are most effective, that is, between 3 and 4 years of age. During this time, when language development is most directly dependent on sense perception, absent or defective functions of perception—body image, spatial orientation, and figure ground discrimination leading to symbol behavior-may be developed by training. This References 1. Gesell, A., and Ilg, F. L.: Child Development , New York, Harper & Brothers, 1949, pp. 141-144; 160-161. 2. Kastein, S., and Fowler, E. P., Jr.: Differential Diagnosis of Communication Disorders in Children Referred for Hearing Tests , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 60:468-477 ( (Oct.) ) 1954.Crossref 3. Silverman, W. A.; Andersen, D. H.; Blanc, W. A.; and Crozier, D. N.: A Difference in Mortality Rate and Incidence of Kernicterus Among Premature Infants Alotted to 2 Prophylactic Antibacterial Regimens , Pediatrics 18:614-625 ( (Oct.) ) 1956. 4. Silverman, W. A.: Fate, at Age 2 Years, of Premature Infants Treated with Penicillin/Sulfisoxazole and Oxytetracycline During the First 5 Days of Life, to be published. 5. Strauss, A. A., and Lehtinen, L. E.: Psychopathology and Education of the Brain-Injured Child , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1947, pp. 106-117. 6. Strauss, A. A.; Kephart, N. C.; Lehtinen, L. E., and Goldenberg, S.: Psychopathology and Education of the Brain-Injured Child , Vol. II, New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., New York, 1955, pp. 67-75.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1959

References