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Lacrimal Gland Response to Parasympathicomimetics After Parasympathetic Denervation

Lacrimal Gland Response to Parasympathicomimetics After Parasympathetic Denervation Abstract It is fairly generally accepted that, in man, the main nervous supply of the lacrimal gland is of parasympathetic origin and that it emerges from the bulbar region together with the seventh cranial nerve. Leaving the facial nerve at the level of the geniculate ganglion, the secretory fibers join the great superficial petrosal and the vidian nerve to reach the sphenopalatine ganglion. From the ganglion they travel with the sphenopalatine nerves to the maxillary nerve. They reach the gland by way of the zygomatic and zygomaticotemporal nerve, which communicates with the lacrimal nerve. It is believed that, whereas all other nerve fibers pass through the sphenopalatine ganglion uninterrupted, the secretory fibers destined for the lacrimal gland synapse in the ganglion. This assumption, which seems to be based on histological work of L. R. Müller (1924), fits well into our general concept of the building-scheme of the parasympathetic nervous system whose References 1. Emmelin, N. C., and Strömblad, B. C. R.: Sensitization of the Lacrimal Gland by Treatment with a Parasympathicolytic Agent , Acta physiol. scandinav. 36:171, 1956.Crossref 2. Goldzieher, W.: Beitrag zur Physiologie der Thränensecretion , Arch. Augenh. 28:7, 1894. 3. Keil, F. C., Jr., and Root, W. S.: Parasympathetic Sensitization in the Cat's Eye , Am. J. Physiol. 132:437, 1941. 4. Maes, J. P.: The Effect of the Removal of the Superior Cervical Ganglion on Lachrymal Secretion , Am. J. Physiol. 123:359, 1938. 5. Müller, L. R.: Die Lebensnerven , Berlin, Springer-Verlag, 1924. 6. Pierce, F. R., and Gregersen, M. I.: Changes in the Submaxillary Secretory Response to Pilocarpine After Section of the Chorda Tympani , Am. J. Physiol. 120:246, 1937. 7. Sjögren, H.: Zur Kenntnis der Keratoconjunctivitis sicca , Acta ophth. ( (Supp. 2) ) pp. 1-151, 1933. 8. Wills, J. H.: Sensitization of the Submaxillary Gland to Acetylcholine by Section of the Chorda Tympani , Am. J. Physiol. 135:523, 1942. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Lacrimal Gland Response to Parasympathicomimetics After Parasympathetic Denervation

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 64 (1) – Jul 1, 1960

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1960.01840010036002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract It is fairly generally accepted that, in man, the main nervous supply of the lacrimal gland is of parasympathetic origin and that it emerges from the bulbar region together with the seventh cranial nerve. Leaving the facial nerve at the level of the geniculate ganglion, the secretory fibers join the great superficial petrosal and the vidian nerve to reach the sphenopalatine ganglion. From the ganglion they travel with the sphenopalatine nerves to the maxillary nerve. They reach the gland by way of the zygomatic and zygomaticotemporal nerve, which communicates with the lacrimal nerve. It is believed that, whereas all other nerve fibers pass through the sphenopalatine ganglion uninterrupted, the secretory fibers destined for the lacrimal gland synapse in the ganglion. This assumption, which seems to be based on histological work of L. R. Müller (1924), fits well into our general concept of the building-scheme of the parasympathetic nervous system whose References 1. Emmelin, N. C., and Strömblad, B. C. R.: Sensitization of the Lacrimal Gland by Treatment with a Parasympathicolytic Agent , Acta physiol. scandinav. 36:171, 1956.Crossref 2. Goldzieher, W.: Beitrag zur Physiologie der Thränensecretion , Arch. Augenh. 28:7, 1894. 3. Keil, F. C., Jr., and Root, W. S.: Parasympathetic Sensitization in the Cat's Eye , Am. J. Physiol. 132:437, 1941. 4. Maes, J. P.: The Effect of the Removal of the Superior Cervical Ganglion on Lachrymal Secretion , Am. J. Physiol. 123:359, 1938. 5. Müller, L. R.: Die Lebensnerven , Berlin, Springer-Verlag, 1924. 6. Pierce, F. R., and Gregersen, M. I.: Changes in the Submaxillary Secretory Response to Pilocarpine After Section of the Chorda Tympani , Am. J. Physiol. 120:246, 1937. 7. Sjögren, H.: Zur Kenntnis der Keratoconjunctivitis sicca , Acta ophth. ( (Supp. 2) ) pp. 1-151, 1933. 8. Wills, J. H.: Sensitization of the Submaxillary Gland to Acetylcholine by Section of the Chorda Tympani , Am. J. Physiol. 135:523, 1942.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1960

References

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