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LACK OF EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTARY VITAMIN B12 ADMINISTERED TO PREMATURE INFANTS

LACK OF EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTARY VITAMIN B12 ADMINISTERED TO PREMATURE INFANTS REPORTS of several investigators have indicated that vitamin B12 has growthpromoting properties.1 The possibility that this compound might be of especial benefit to premature infants, as an accelerator of growth and hematopoiesis, has been put to test by a number of clinics, with entirely negative results.2 The present study is concerned with 117 infants admitted to the premature nursery of Baltimore City Hospitals in 1950. Studies were made of the weight gain, the hemoglobin levels, and the red blood cell counts of two groups of premature infants; one group comprised infants who received a daily oral supplement of 30 μ of a solution of crystalline vitamin B12, and the other was a control group. METHODS Upon admission to the premature nursery infants were assigned alternately to the vitamin B12 group and to the control group. All infants received similar care during the first week of life. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

LACK OF EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTARY VITAMIN B12 ADMINISTERED TO PREMATURE INFANTS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1952.02050020029002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REPORTS of several investigators have indicated that vitamin B12 has growthpromoting properties.1 The possibility that this compound might be of especial benefit to premature infants, as an accelerator of growth and hematopoiesis, has been put to test by a number of clinics, with entirely negative results.2 The present study is concerned with 117 infants admitted to the premature nursery of Baltimore City Hospitals in 1950. Studies were made of the weight gain, the hemoglobin levels, and the red blood cell counts of two groups of premature infants; one group comprised infants who received a daily oral supplement of 30 μ of a solution of crystalline vitamin B12, and the other was a control group. METHODS Upon admission to the premature nursery infants were assigned alternately to the vitamin B12 group and to the control group. All infants received similar care during the first week of life.

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1952

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