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Kissing Bug Bite

Kissing Bug Bite Abstract During the past two years we have seen 45 patients who presented themselves because of lesions which were caused by the bite of Triatoma sanguisuga, an insect commonly known as the "kissing bug." None of these patients had felt a "bite" or seen a bug. When advised as to the cause of their dermatosis, all were able to find the bug in or about their beds and brought it in for identification. Our primary purpose in presenting this paper is to familiarize the medical profession, particularly dermatologists, with the insect and with a characteristic clinical picture which may be produced by its bite. Of secondary but general medical interest is the relationship of the Triatoma family of insects to South American trypanosomiasis, or Chagas' disease, and the fact that the possibility of human infection with this disease exists in the United States. The Bug and References 1. Ressman, A. J., and Pipkin, L., San Antonio, Texas, 1954, personal communication to the authors, and References 4 through 6. 2. Elkins, J. C.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 3. Packchanian, A.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 4. Cited by Howard, L. O.7 5. Elkins, J. C.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 6. Stahl, C.: Monographie der Gattung Conorhinus und Verwandten , Berl. ent. Ztschr. 3:99-117, 1859.Crossref 7. Usinger, R. L.: Triatominae of North and Central America and the West Indies and Their Public Health Significance , Pub. Health Bull. 288, 1944. 8. Packchanian, A.: Natural Infection of Triatoma Gerstakeri with Trypanosoma Cruzi in Texas , Pub. Health Rep. 54:1547-1554, ( (Aug. 25) ) 1939.Crossref 9. Wood, S. F.: Reactions of Man to the Feeding of Reduviid Bugs , J. Parasitol. 28:43-49 ( (Feb.) ) 1942.Crossref 10. Arnold, H. L., and Bell, D. B.: Kissing Bug Bites , Hawaii M. J. 3-121-122 ( (Jan.) -Feb.) 1944. 11. Kofoid, C. A., and Whitaker, B. G.: Natural Infection of American Human Trypanosomiasis in 2 Species of Cone-Nosed Bugs, Triatoma Protracta Uhler and Triatoma Uhleri Neiva, in the Western United States , J. Parasitol. 22:259-263 ( (June) ) 1936.Crossref 12. Howard, L. O.: Insects to Which the Name Kissing Bug Became Applied in the Summer of 1899, U. S. Department of Agriculture , Division of Entomology Bulletin 22:24-30, 1900. 13. Ryckman, R. E.: Recent Observations of Cannibalism in Triatoma (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) , J. Parasitol. 37:433-434 ( (Oct.) ) 1951.Crossref 14. Balazuc, J.: Anaphylactic Phenomenon Caused by Triatoma Bite , An. Inst. med. reg., Univ. Nac. Tucumán , 3:35-37 ( (May) ) 1950. 15. Ressman, A. C.; Pipkin, J. L., and Lehmann, C. F.: Poisonous Arthropods of Southwest Texas, to be published. 16. Brumpt, E.; Mazzotti, L., and Brumpt, L.: Enquétes épidémiologiques sur la maladie de C. Chagas au Mexique. Réduvidés vecteurs. Animaux réservoirs de virus . Cas humains, Ann. parasitol. 17:299-312 ( (July) ) 1939. 17. Miller, J. W.: Chagas Disease in Panama, Report of 3 Cases , South. M. J. 24:645-647 ( (July) ) 1931.Crossref 18. Davis, D. J.; McGregor, T., and de Shazo, T.: Triatoma Sanguisuga (LeConte) and Triatoma Ambuiga Neiva as Natural Carriers of Trypanosoma Cruzi in Texas , Pub. Health Rep. 58:353, 1943.Crossref 19. Sullivan, T. D.; McGregor, T.; Eads, R. B., and Davis, D. J.: Incidence of Trypanosoma Cruzi, Chagas, in Triatoma (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) in Texas , Am. J. Trop. Med. 29:453-458 ( (July) ) 1949. 20. Wood, F. D.: Natural and Experimental Infection of Triatoma Protracta Uhler and Mammals in California with American Human Trypanosomiasis , Am. J. Trop. Med. 14:497-517 ( (Nov.) ) 1934. 21. Packchanian, A.: Infectivity of Texas Strain of Trypanosoma Cruzi to Man , Am. J. Trop. Med. 23:309-314 ( (May) ) 1943. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550070016004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract During the past two years we have seen 45 patients who presented themselves because of lesions which were caused by the bite of Triatoma sanguisuga, an insect commonly known as the "kissing bug." None of these patients had felt a "bite" or seen a bug. When advised as to the cause of their dermatosis, all were able to find the bug in or about their beds and brought it in for identification. Our primary purpose in presenting this paper is to familiarize the medical profession, particularly dermatologists, with the insect and with a characteristic clinical picture which may be produced by its bite. Of secondary but general medical interest is the relationship of the Triatoma family of insects to South American trypanosomiasis, or Chagas' disease, and the fact that the possibility of human infection with this disease exists in the United States. The Bug and References 1. Ressman, A. J., and Pipkin, L., San Antonio, Texas, 1954, personal communication to the authors, and References 4 through 6. 2. Elkins, J. C.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 3. Packchanian, A.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 4. Cited by Howard, L. O.7 5. Elkins, J. C.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 6. Stahl, C.: Monographie der Gattung Conorhinus und Verwandten , Berl. ent. Ztschr. 3:99-117, 1859.Crossref 7. Usinger, R. L.: Triatominae of North and Central America and the West Indies and Their Public Health Significance , Pub. Health Bull. 288, 1944. 8. Packchanian, A.: Natural Infection of Triatoma Gerstakeri with Trypanosoma Cruzi in Texas , Pub. Health Rep. 54:1547-1554, ( (Aug. 25) ) 1939.Crossref 9. Wood, S. F.: Reactions of Man to the Feeding of Reduviid Bugs , J. Parasitol. 28:43-49 ( (Feb.) ) 1942.Crossref 10. Arnold, H. L., and Bell, D. B.: Kissing Bug Bites , Hawaii M. J. 3-121-122 ( (Jan.) -Feb.) 1944. 11. Kofoid, C. A., and Whitaker, B. G.: Natural Infection of American Human Trypanosomiasis in 2 Species of Cone-Nosed Bugs, Triatoma Protracta Uhler and Triatoma Uhleri Neiva, in the Western United States , J. Parasitol. 22:259-263 ( (June) ) 1936.Crossref 12. Howard, L. O.: Insects to Which the Name Kissing Bug Became Applied in the Summer of 1899, U. S. Department of Agriculture , Division of Entomology Bulletin 22:24-30, 1900. 13. Ryckman, R. E.: Recent Observations of Cannibalism in Triatoma (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) , J. Parasitol. 37:433-434 ( (Oct.) ) 1951.Crossref 14. Balazuc, J.: Anaphylactic Phenomenon Caused by Triatoma Bite , An. Inst. med. reg., Univ. Nac. Tucumán , 3:35-37 ( (May) ) 1950. 15. Ressman, A. C.; Pipkin, J. L., and Lehmann, C. F.: Poisonous Arthropods of Southwest Texas, to be published. 16. Brumpt, E.; Mazzotti, L., and Brumpt, L.: Enquétes épidémiologiques sur la maladie de C. Chagas au Mexique. Réduvidés vecteurs. Animaux réservoirs de virus . Cas humains, Ann. parasitol. 17:299-312 ( (July) ) 1939. 17. Miller, J. W.: Chagas Disease in Panama, Report of 3 Cases , South. M. J. 24:645-647 ( (July) ) 1931.Crossref 18. Davis, D. J.; McGregor, T., and de Shazo, T.: Triatoma Sanguisuga (LeConte) and Triatoma Ambuiga Neiva as Natural Carriers of Trypanosoma Cruzi in Texas , Pub. Health Rep. 58:353, 1943.Crossref 19. Sullivan, T. D.; McGregor, T.; Eads, R. B., and Davis, D. J.: Incidence of Trypanosoma Cruzi, Chagas, in Triatoma (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) in Texas , Am. J. Trop. Med. 29:453-458 ( (July) ) 1949. 20. Wood, F. D.: Natural and Experimental Infection of Triatoma Protracta Uhler and Mammals in California with American Human Trypanosomiasis , Am. J. Trop. Med. 14:497-517 ( (Nov.) ) 1934. 21. Packchanian, A.: Infectivity of Texas Strain of Trypanosoma Cruzi to Man , Am. J. Trop. Med. 23:309-314 ( (May) ) 1943.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1956

References