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It’s About the Weight Loss

It’s About the Weight Loss Factors Associated With a Body Mass Index Less Than 30 After Bariatric Surgery Original Investigation Research Invited Commentary Bruce M. Wolfe, MD; Elizaveta Walker, MPH The article by Varban et al in this issue of JAMA Surgery re- of longer-term outcomes following MBS have found correla- ports several findings that constitute an important contribu- tions between comorbidity responses and weight loss but not tion to the field of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS). These baseline BMI. Sundbom et al found that comorbidity re- include an improved response rate for all obesity-related co- sponse, with 5-year data from the Scandinavian Obesity Sur- morbid conditions reported gery registry, was consistently predicted by weight loss in- among those patients who stead of baseline BMI. Similarly, the National Institutes of Related article page 1058 achieve a body mass index Health–funded multicenter bariatric surgery consortium, known (BMI, calculated as weight in as the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery, reported kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of less than 30 that weight loss, not baseline BMI, predicted remission of type 5 3 at 1 year following surgery. Patients achieving a BMI of less than 2 diabetes following surgery. Contrary to Schauer et al and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Surgery American Medical Association

It’s About the Weight Loss

JAMA Surgery , Volume 152 (11) – Nov 26, 2017

It’s About the Weight Loss

Abstract

Factors Associated With a Body Mass Index Less Than 30 After Bariatric Surgery Original Investigation Research Invited Commentary Bruce M. Wolfe, MD; Elizaveta Walker, MPH The article by Varban et al in this issue of JAMA Surgery re- of longer-term outcomes following MBS have found correla- ports several findings that constitute an important contribu- tions between comorbidity responses and weight loss but not tion to the field of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS). These baseline BMI....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6254
eISSN
2168-6262
DOI
10.1001/jamasurg.2017.2349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Factors Associated With a Body Mass Index Less Than 30 After Bariatric Surgery Original Investigation Research Invited Commentary Bruce M. Wolfe, MD; Elizaveta Walker, MPH The article by Varban et al in this issue of JAMA Surgery re- of longer-term outcomes following MBS have found correla- ports several findings that constitute an important contribu- tions between comorbidity responses and weight loss but not tion to the field of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS). These baseline BMI. Sundbom et al found that comorbidity re- include an improved response rate for all obesity-related co- sponse, with 5-year data from the Scandinavian Obesity Sur- morbid conditions reported gery registry, was consistently predicted by weight loss in- among those patients who stead of baseline BMI. Similarly, the National Institutes of Related article page 1058 achieve a body mass index Health–funded multicenter bariatric surgery consortium, known (BMI, calculated as weight in as the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery, reported kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of less than 30 that weight loss, not baseline BMI, predicted remission of type 5 3 at 1 year following surgery. Patients achieving a BMI of less than 2 diabetes following surgery. Contrary to Schauer et al and

Journal

JAMA SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 26, 2017

References