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Issues Regarding Antiretroviral Treatment for Patients With HIV-1 Infection

Issues Regarding Antiretroviral Treatment for Patients With HIV-1 Infection To the Editor. —The Consensus Statement by Dr Carpenter and colleagues,1 while providing a paradigm for antiretroviral therapy of adults, does not address the therapy of HIV-1 infected children. A recent report by Luzuriaga and colleagues2 demonstrated the propensity for the HIV-1 infection of young infants and children to rapidly develop drug resistance during treatment with the combination of zidovudine, didanosine, and nevirapine. While HIV-1 RNA levels were markedly suppressed after starting therapy, at least 5 of the 8 children had a rebound in HIV-1 RNA levels and developed drug resistance within 6 months of initiating treatment. This is in stark contrast to the duration of the antiviral responses to this combination therapy observed in adults, most of whom had persistent suppression of viral replication to below the limits of detection for at least 10 months.3 A similar propensity for HIV-1 to rapidly develop resistance has been observed among http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Issues Regarding Antiretroviral Treatment for Patients With HIV-1 Infection

JAMA , Volume 278 (15) – Oct 15, 1997

Issues Regarding Antiretroviral Treatment for Patients With HIV-1 Infection

Abstract



To the Editor.
—The Consensus Statement by Dr Carpenter and colleagues,1 while providing a paradigm for antiretroviral therapy of adults, does not address the therapy of HIV-1 infected children.
A recent report by Luzuriaga and colleagues2 demonstrated the propensity for the HIV-1 infection of young infants and children to rapidly develop drug resistance during treatment with the combination of zidovudine, didanosine, and nevirapine. While HIV-1 RNA...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1997.03550150038026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor. —The Consensus Statement by Dr Carpenter and colleagues,1 while providing a paradigm for antiretroviral therapy of adults, does not address the therapy of HIV-1 infected children. A recent report by Luzuriaga and colleagues2 demonstrated the propensity for the HIV-1 infection of young infants and children to rapidly develop drug resistance during treatment with the combination of zidovudine, didanosine, and nevirapine. While HIV-1 RNA levels were markedly suppressed after starting therapy, at least 5 of the 8 children had a rebound in HIV-1 RNA levels and developed drug resistance within 6 months of initiating treatment. This is in stark contrast to the duration of the antiviral responses to this combination therapy observed in adults, most of whom had persistent suppression of viral replication to below the limits of detection for at least 10 months.3 A similar propensity for HIV-1 to rapidly develop resistance has been observed among

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 15, 1997

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