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Is Universal Neonatal Hemoglobinopathy Screening Cost-effective?

Is Universal Neonatal Hemoglobinopathy Screening Cost-effective? Abstract The article by Sprinkle et al1 published in the May issue of the Archives is an example of how the "science" of economics can be employed to justify most any conclusion. Costs and benefits depend on what factors are laid on the scale. In this case, some of the important ingredients were left on the shelf. The authors criticize other work that focuses solely on the decreased risk of pneumococcal sepsis in infants receiving prophylactic penicillin after the diagnosis of sickle-cell disease (SCD) was made. They say, [This approach] does not account for a range of other unambiguously valuable effects. The early diagnosis of non-SCD conditions such as sickle trait, nonsickle hemoglobinopathies, and some thalassemias allows the timely provision of genetic, medical, and social-services counseling." A valid cost-benefit analysis would attempt to factor in the extent of harm inflicted on the huge number of infants with false-positive results, as References 1. Sprinkle RH, Hynes DM, Konrad TR. Is universal neonatal hemoglobinopathy screening cost-effective? Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 1994;148:461-469.Crossref 2. Stamatoyannopoulos G. Problems in screening and counseling in the hemoglobinopathies . In: Motolsky AG, Ebling FJG, eds. Birth Defects: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference . Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Excerpta Medica; 1974:268-276. 3. Hampton ML, Anderson J, Lavizzo BS, Bergman AB. Sickle cell 'nondisease': a potentially serious public health problem . AJDC . 1974;128:58-61. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

Is Universal Neonatal Hemoglobinopathy Screening Cost-effective?

Is Universal Neonatal Hemoglobinopathy Screening Cost-effective?

Abstract

Abstract The article by Sprinkle et al1 published in the May issue of the Archives is an example of how the "science" of economics can be employed to justify most any conclusion. Costs and benefits depend on what factors are laid on the scale. In this case, some of the important ingredients were left on the shelf. The authors criticize other work that focuses solely on the decreased risk of pneumococcal sepsis in infants receiving prophylactic penicillin after the diagnosis of...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170160120022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The article by Sprinkle et al1 published in the May issue of the Archives is an example of how the "science" of economics can be employed to justify most any conclusion. Costs and benefits depend on what factors are laid on the scale. In this case, some of the important ingredients were left on the shelf. The authors criticize other work that focuses solely on the decreased risk of pneumococcal sepsis in infants receiving prophylactic penicillin after the diagnosis of sickle-cell disease (SCD) was made. They say, [This approach] does not account for a range of other unambiguously valuable effects. The early diagnosis of non-SCD conditions such as sickle trait, nonsickle hemoglobinopathies, and some thalassemias allows the timely provision of genetic, medical, and social-services counseling." A valid cost-benefit analysis would attempt to factor in the extent of harm inflicted on the huge number of infants with false-positive results, as References 1. Sprinkle RH, Hynes DM, Konrad TR. Is universal neonatal hemoglobinopathy screening cost-effective? Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 1994;148:461-469.Crossref 2. Stamatoyannopoulos G. Problems in screening and counseling in the hemoglobinopathies . In: Motolsky AG, Ebling FJG, eds. Birth Defects: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference . Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Excerpta Medica; 1974:268-276. 3. Hampton ML, Anderson J, Lavizzo BS, Bergman AB. Sickle cell 'nondisease': a potentially serious public health problem . AJDC . 1974;128:58-61.

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1995

References