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Is the Ophthalmologist as a Clinician-Scientist Still Viable?

Is the Ophthalmologist as a Clinician-Scientist Still Viable? This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract When I was in medical school over 20 years ago, among the higher truths that I was taught was the belief in the importance and high priority of clinicians' active involvement in research activities. The nature of medical discovery was such that it often required a physician-initiated research endeavor to bring the knowledge of science to improved treatment of human disease. The fear among physicians of choosing a career as clinician-scientist was that one might prove unworthy and not succeed, but the merit of the pursuit was never in doubt. The stated goals of most departments of ophthalmology involved nurturing and protecting such investigation-oriented physicians. Finding new knowledge that could be applied to human disease was the most sacred and important of pathways, and was part of the philosophy that it was important for physicians to "return something to the system" that had helped foster their careers. Although the above http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Is the Ophthalmologist as a Clinician-Scientist Still Viable?

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 109 (11) – Nov 1, 1991

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1991.01080110059034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract When I was in medical school over 20 years ago, among the higher truths that I was taught was the belief in the importance and high priority of clinicians' active involvement in research activities. The nature of medical discovery was such that it often required a physician-initiated research endeavor to bring the knowledge of science to improved treatment of human disease. The fear among physicians of choosing a career as clinician-scientist was that one might prove unworthy and not succeed, but the merit of the pursuit was never in doubt. The stated goals of most departments of ophthalmology involved nurturing and protecting such investigation-oriented physicians. Finding new knowledge that could be applied to human disease was the most sacred and important of pathways, and was part of the philosophy that it was important for physicians to "return something to the system" that had helped foster their careers. Although the above

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1991

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