Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Is Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Still the Superior Reperfusion Strategy?

Is Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Still the Superior Reperfusion Strategy? Research Original Investigation Fibrinolysis Use Among Hospital Transfer Patients Invited Commentary Is Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Still the Superior Reperfusion Strategy? Marc J. Claeys, MD, PhD The current guidelines for the management of ST-segment el- Figure. Patient-Related Delay and System-Related Delay evation myocardial infarction (STEMI) recommend primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) as the preferred First medical Symptom onset contact Diagnosis Reperfusion therapy treatment strategy if it can be conducted in a timely fash- Related article page 207 ion by an experienced cath- Patient delay eterization team. Because of the restricted availability of hospitals providing pPCI support System delay 24 hours 7 days a week, the concept of STEMI networks with prearranged rapid transfer protocols between community hos- Time to reperfusion therapy pitals and PCI-capable centers has been developed. The goal is to offer pPCI, which is currently considered the superior rep- erfusion therapy, to a maximum number of patients with STEMI. Although initial experiences with local STEMI net- works were encouraging, the transition from thrombolysis to lays. The article by Vora et al demonstrates that, when the es- PCI for patients admitted to community hospitals requires close timated drive time exceeded 30 minutes, half of the patients follow-up because http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Is Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Still the Superior Reperfusion Strategy?

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 175 (2) – Feb 1, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/is-primary-percutaneous-coronary-intervention-still-the-superior-eg45ZQyFRH
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.6586
pmid
25486596
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research Original Investigation Fibrinolysis Use Among Hospital Transfer Patients Invited Commentary Is Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Still the Superior Reperfusion Strategy? Marc J. Claeys, MD, PhD The current guidelines for the management of ST-segment el- Figure. Patient-Related Delay and System-Related Delay evation myocardial infarction (STEMI) recommend primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) as the preferred First medical Symptom onset contact Diagnosis Reperfusion therapy treatment strategy if it can be conducted in a timely fash- Related article page 207 ion by an experienced cath- Patient delay eterization team. Because of the restricted availability of hospitals providing pPCI support System delay 24 hours 7 days a week, the concept of STEMI networks with prearranged rapid transfer protocols between community hos- Time to reperfusion therapy pitals and PCI-capable centers has been developed. The goal is to offer pPCI, which is currently considered the superior rep- erfusion therapy, to a maximum number of patients with STEMI. Although initial experiences with local STEMI net- works were encouraging, the transition from thrombolysis to lays. The article by Vora et al demonstrates that, when the es- PCI for patients admitted to community hospitals requires close timated drive time exceeded 30 minutes, half of the patients follow-up because

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 2015

References