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IS DIPHTHERIA FREQUENTLY A BACTEREMIA?

IS DIPHTHERIA FREQUENTLY A BACTEREMIA? In August last, Conradi and Bierast1 of the Hygienic Institute of the University of Halle reported the results of an extensive examination of the urine of diphtheria patients. They call attention to the fact, that, while diphtheria has been regarded as essentially a local disease, yet the Loeffler bacillus has frequently been isolated from the blood and organs after death, and occasionally from the blood during life, usually, however, in the agonal stage of the disease. On account of the technical and other difficulties of obtaining a sufficiently large quantity of blood from diphtheria patients, they sought to solve the question of diphtheria bacteremia by an indirect method, namely, an examination of the urine of those actively ill, and of convalescents. In all, 155 patients were examined, of whom fifty-four showed a positive urine. In six cases only, however, were virulence tests made, all of which proved positive. As http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1913 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1913.04100310026003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In August last, Conradi and Bierast1 of the Hygienic Institute of the University of Halle reported the results of an extensive examination of the urine of diphtheria patients. They call attention to the fact, that, while diphtheria has been regarded as essentially a local disease, yet the Loeffler bacillus has frequently been isolated from the blood and organs after death, and occasionally from the blood during life, usually, however, in the agonal stage of the disease. On account of the technical and other difficulties of obtaining a sufficiently large quantity of blood from diphtheria patients, they sought to solve the question of diphtheria bacteremia by an indirect method, namely, an examination of the urine of those actively ill, and of convalescents. In all, 155 patients were examined, of whom fifty-four showed a positive urine. In six cases only, however, were virulence tests made, all of which proved positive. As

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1913

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