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Invited Commentary

Invited Commentary This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The article by Hiatt et al is an important contribution to the field of surgical education and the question of proctoring and credentialing. It is timely as well, as telemedicine is finally taking root and spreading to many disciplines, including surgery. While agreeing with the overall premise, there are exceptions to a few of the conclusions. For any task other than observation (or telemonitoring) there is no proof (and this study does not provide proof) that anything less than "lossless" compression is adequate for tasks such as teleproctoring or telementoring. Compression schemata are also topics of very hot debate in radiological circles, where numerous studies have demonstrateloss-t only lossless compression is acceptable. It is encouraging that current laboratory schemata have achieved lossless ratios of 100:1. It must be commented that this study's methodology used a frame rate of 15 frames per second (fps) or less; it should be noted that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Invited Commentary

Archives of Surgery , Volume 131 (4) – Apr 1, 1996

Invited Commentary

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The article by Hiatt et al is an important contribution to the field of surgical education and the question of proctoring and credentialing. It is timely as well, as telemedicine is finally taking root and spreading to many disciplines, including surgery. While agreeing with the overall premise, there are exceptions to a few of the conclusions. For any...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1996.01430160059010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The article by Hiatt et al is an important contribution to the field of surgical education and the question of proctoring and credentialing. It is timely as well, as telemedicine is finally taking root and spreading to many disciplines, including surgery. While agreeing with the overall premise, there are exceptions to a few of the conclusions. For any task other than observation (or telemonitoring) there is no proof (and this study does not provide proof) that anything less than "lossless" compression is adequate for tasks such as teleproctoring or telementoring. Compression schemata are also topics of very hot debate in radiological circles, where numerous studies have demonstrateloss-t only lossless compression is acceptable. It is encouraging that current laboratory schemata have achieved lossless ratios of 100:1. It must be commented that this study's methodology used a frame rate of 15 frames per second (fps) or less; it should be noted that

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1996

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