Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

INTRAOCULAR RUBBER FOREIGN BODIES AFTER SURGERY

INTRAOCULAR RUBBER FOREIGN BODIES AFTER SURGERY Abstract AFTER intraocular surgery foreign material is noted occasionally in the ocular tissues clinically and very often histologically. In some cases the foreign material may act as a toxic substance, effecting a postoperative inflammatory reaction. Duszynski1 recently reported on this problem with special reference to lint from drapes and powder used on gloves. He presented photomicrographs, taken with polarized light, of ocular tissues after glaucoma surgery. Foreign material was surrounded by granulomatous tissue. In 1928 Doherty2 reported a case in which presumed India-rubber foreign particles were first noted 11 years after an extracapsular cataract extraction. Six red particles, 1 to 2 mm. in diameter, were seen in the iris crypts, without inflammatory reaction or fibrosis. It was believed that the particles were rubber introduced by an irrigating system with a rubber bulb. In 1948 Doherty3 mentioned three cases of rubber foreign bodies in the eye and stated that References 1. Duszynski, L. R.: Contamination of Operative Wounds with Cotton Fibrils and Talc , Tr. Am. Acad. Ophth. 55:110-115 ( (Nov.-Dec.) ) 1950. 2. Doherty, W. B.: India Rubber in Anterior Chamber: Report of Case; Also Description of Anterior Chamber Irrigator , Am. J. Ophth. 11:16-17 ( (Jan.) ) 1928. 3. Doherty, W. B.: Use of Glass Irrigator for Anterior Chamber , Arch. Ophth. 39:818-819 ( (June) ) 1948.Crossref 4. Dr. W. Morton Grant called attention to these particles at the time of operation. 5. Doherty.2,3 6. Heath, P.: Anterior Chamber Irrigator , Tr. Sec. Ophth. A. M. A. , p. 260, 1937. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

INTRAOCULAR RUBBER FOREIGN BODIES AFTER SURGERY

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/intraocular-rubber-foreign-bodies-after-surgery-800uY7BZiD
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1952.01700030475008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract AFTER intraocular surgery foreign material is noted occasionally in the ocular tissues clinically and very often histologically. In some cases the foreign material may act as a toxic substance, effecting a postoperative inflammatory reaction. Duszynski1 recently reported on this problem with special reference to lint from drapes and powder used on gloves. He presented photomicrographs, taken with polarized light, of ocular tissues after glaucoma surgery. Foreign material was surrounded by granulomatous tissue. In 1928 Doherty2 reported a case in which presumed India-rubber foreign particles were first noted 11 years after an extracapsular cataract extraction. Six red particles, 1 to 2 mm. in diameter, were seen in the iris crypts, without inflammatory reaction or fibrosis. It was believed that the particles were rubber introduced by an irrigating system with a rubber bulb. In 1948 Doherty3 mentioned three cases of rubber foreign bodies in the eye and stated that References 1. Duszynski, L. R.: Contamination of Operative Wounds with Cotton Fibrils and Talc , Tr. Am. Acad. Ophth. 55:110-115 ( (Nov.-Dec.) ) 1950. 2. Doherty, W. B.: India Rubber in Anterior Chamber: Report of Case; Also Description of Anterior Chamber Irrigator , Am. J. Ophth. 11:16-17 ( (Jan.) ) 1928. 3. Doherty, W. B.: Use of Glass Irrigator for Anterior Chamber , Arch. Ophth. 39:818-819 ( (June) ) 1948.Crossref 4. Dr. W. Morton Grant called attention to these particles at the time of operation. 5. Doherty.2,3 6. Heath, P.: Anterior Chamber Irrigator , Tr. Sec. Ophth. A. M. A. , p. 260, 1937.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1952

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month